Ask the Vet

posted July 15th, 2007 by
  • Share

This issue’s participating veterinarian:    Mark Shackelford, 15th Street Veterinary  Group, Tulsa

Q: I have a 15 year old lab female who’s in pretty good shape for her age.   Lately, though, she’s developed this “cough.”   She does it mainly in the mornings and recently it’s become more persistent.   Should she be checked for this?

A: Most definitely.  Coughing can be a symptom of several maladies, including heartworm disease, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, allergic bronchitis, cardiomyopathy, congestive heart disease, lung cancer, and several other pathologies that can affect the upper and lower airways.  You should see your veterinarian for a full examination, which will probably include a chest radiograph and blood tests.

 

Q: My older dog has a nasty habit that could be medical-related.  After she goes out to do her “business,” she comes back in a “scoots” across the rug.   It’s especially embarrassing when guests are here.   Is there anything I can do about this?  

A: Your veterinarian can perform an examination to that area of your dog’s anatomy to rule out several causes of her scooting.  Among other things, anal sacs, which are located on either side of the anus, can become impacted and are usually easily emptied by a qualified professional.  Skin allergies can be another major cause of itching, which will cause the scooting.  You want to be sure that fleas are not a problem by using any one of the recommended topical and oral products that are available. 

Q: My old dog (13) is showing signs of cataracts.   How do I know when it’s time to remove them?

A: Cataracts, or an opacity of the lens of the eye, are fairly common in older animals.  Cataracts should not be confused with a more common condition in the older animal called lenticular sclerosis, which is a thickening of the lens of the eye.  This condition of the lens causes a gray color, but does not usually cause blindness.  Cataracts are a complete opacity of the lens, which means light cannot penetrate to the retina at the back of the eye.  This barrier to the retina results in blindness.  Other causes of cataracts are diabetes and trauma to the eye. Observing symptoms of blindness, such as running into walls or furniture, is the time to consider removing cataracts.  A qualified veterinary ophthalmologist can surgically remove cataracts, which can result in a significantly improved field of vision.

Have a question for October’s Ask the Vet Column?   Email [email protected].

No Responses to “Ask the Vet”

Leave a Reply