Author Archives: Marilyn

Kitten Stuck Inside Abe Lincoln Statue

posted November 20th, 2012 by
TPM Logo_edited-3

The Cat Clinic of Owasso is now open

posted October 19th, 2011 by

Attention all Owasso Feline Lovers — there is a new feline exclusive clinic in Owasso at 9540 N. Garnett Road.  Dr. Sharon Baker and her team run the Cat Clinic of Owasso and are open to welcome your business.   Providing wellness care, basic medicine, and boarding, the Cat Clinic of Owasso is a warm and inviting new clinic for your feline friend.   918.609.8216 or www.catclinicofowasso.com .

Pawprints Around Town

posted July 15th, 2011 by

The Posh Pup Pet Boutique and Spa now has an onsite veterinarian two days per week. Dr. Andrea Harl of Veterinary Associates provides wellness checks, administers vaccines, and performs other basic vet care on Tuesdays from 9-12 and Thursdays from 12-3. No appointment necessary. The Posh Pup, 8263 S. Harvard, Tulsa (918) 935-3990.

Tulsa’s Southern Hills Veterinary Hospital is pleased to announce their “Senior House Calls Service,” available to any senior 65 or older. The doctors examine pets in private homes or in nursing homes and assisted living facilities. Call Melody Tangyunyong at 918.779.5773 or email her at [email protected] for more details and appointments.

River Trail Animal Hospital & Pet Lodge is now open at 101st
& Riverside in Tulsa. This brand new hospital is the creation of Drs. Ron Hooley and Roddy Roberts; the hospital offers complete veterinary care plus pet lodge. (918) 728-7494;
www.rivertrailanimalhospital.com.

Kelly’s Dazzle Dog Grooming Spa – 3711 S. Harvard, Tulsa – now has pick-up and delivery service! Call them at 918-749-1015 for details.

Coming soon… Spay FIRST!, a soon-to-open Oklahomabased organization dedicated to promoting grass roots efforts to start or expand spay neuter programs in underserved areas. Spay FIRST! will explore the many types of programs that can prevent suffering, reduce shelter intakes and help animal advocates make a difference!

Note: If you have news about what’s new or changing in the world of pets in our community, please email a brief item to [email protected], Subject line: Pawprints.

Publisher’s Letter

posted July 15th, 2011 by

Dear Pet Lover,

Welcome to this July issue of TulsaPets Magazine, and thanks for picking up a copy. I hope you enjoy this issue and that you tell your family and friends about us.

I have long wanted to feature guinea pigs in the magazine, and I got my wish this issue. Our cover story features the guinea pig, a sweet and gentle little critter. The guinea pig is often a child’s first pet primarily because of their calm, non-biting nature. I had guinea pigs as a kid and my most memorable was my Genuwen. He would sleep on my pillow at night and I could trust him not to escape throughout the house. And though he’s long gone, I dedicate this issue to him.

We have two exciting new additions to our web site. We are now including many more adoption showings, from Saturday PetSmart showings to other non-recurring events. We hope to provide a onestop resource for pet adoption opportunities, so please keep checking the Next Adoption Showings on our home page and spread the word to get out and go pet adopting!

We’re also featuring another new segment on the home page on Pets with Special Needs available for adoption – those pets that most often get overlooked and are probably first in line to be put down because of certain health issues. There are so many special needs pets that do make wonderful companions and we hope to help these most special pets with this new web feature.

We also want to announce that Casey Rose Largent will be coordinating these two web site additions, and she comes on board as our Rescue Coordinator and Events Liaison. Welcome aboard, Casey Rose!

For anyone who read An Unfinished Story in the May issue (page 26) about Buddy the cat that was separated from his person because the new landlord ruled “no pets,” there is some good that has come from this story! Camille Hulen, the story’s author and temporary keeper of Buddy, has received several calls of people concerned, wanting to help. Three people have offered Buddy’s “dad” transportation to Camille’s Cathouse to visit, and Camille has also received money and a gas card to pass along. What a nice thought to know that there are generous strangers who want to help just to help. Life is good! Stay tuned for a hopeful happy ending to this Unfinished Story.

We’ll be back in September with lots of good tales, so in the meantime keep up to date with the local pet news on our web site, www.tulsapetsmagazine.com. Thank you to everyone who helped make another issue of TulsaPets Magazine possible!

Marilyn King and Elmer Fudd

Factoring the finances of furry friends

posted May 15th, 2011 by

By Dolores Proubasta

When applying to adopt a dog from a shelter, a woman estimated that she would spend $40 annually to feed and care for her new pet. Her application was turned down because $40 will not pay even the average monthly bill for keeping a mid-size dog – properly.

In reality, it costs approximately $700 annually (about $60 monthly) to cover minimum humane care for a medium size dog and the same for a cat, according to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA).

The organization also estimates that a newly arrived medium-size dog costs approximately $1,500 for the first year and $1,000 for a new cat’s first year, factoring in spay/neuter surgery, essential vet care, housing equipment and supplies. Don’t forget to factor in the costs of unexpected vet care, and other subjective decisions such as travel and boarding, pet sitters, training. Costs can vary, too, based on geography, climate and cost of living. Not all 93.6 million cats, 77.5 million dogs, and other pets such as horses, small mammals, birds, reptiles, and fish get an equitable share of the $47 plus billion the American Pet Products Association says was spent on them in 2010.
Pets’ quality of life has little to do with the ability of the owners to afford them. Household income is an indicator of quality of care an animal could receive. The attitude of the pet owner who treats the pet as a “partner,” entitled to comparable food, shelter, medication, and more is what mainly drives pet care costs.

This seems a simple rule of thumb, but it isn’t. In economic downturns, companion animals are turned over to shelters or denied medical care by some owners who state that they cannot afford the pet, but, for example, may deem the expense of a weekly manicure more important.

The basic laws of Pet Economics are: (1) Every dollar saved at the expense of quality and best practices will require a larger outlay later, and (2) Expect unexpected expenses.

Here is a listing of “penny wise, pound foolish” pet care practices
• Not spaying or neutering pets. Caring properly for a pregnant or nursing dog and her pups, even without medical complications, is as expensive as having her spayed at the swankiest veterinary clinic.
Ditto for patching the wounds of intact males.
• Skipping routine checkups, vaccines, and parasite prevention.
Undetected or preventable ailments will result in higher vet bills.
A veterinarian can give valuable pet care information to owners.
• Feeding cheap food. Many of the ingredients in low quality kibble lack nutritional value, most of it is lost to bowel movements, and the pet’s health is compromised by a poor diet.
• Buying products from countries with little or no quality controls.
Cheap, imported leashes, bedding, toys, and other items need frequent replacement; some may even harm the animal.
• Not providing exercise and obedience training. The costs associated with destructive, unruly, or aggressive behavior can be substantial.
Plenty of exercise (time = $) and obedience class fees are a small price to pay to avoid fines, replacement of property, medical bills, and legal fees resulting from a dog running amok.
• Poor or no grooming. All animals, and long haired breeds in particular, require regular bathing and/ or brushing, trimming, or other care to help prevent parasites, skin diseases, ear and eye infections, and more. You can choose between a professional groomer or do it yourself at home, after buying the equipment and products.

Additionally, all animals confined to cages, terrariums, etc.
need meticulously clean environments to groom themselves and stay healthy.

• Asking neighbors, children/teens to look after the pets. If they fail on their duties, the owner has no recourse, because a “favor” is not a contract. Boarding at a reputable kennel or clinic, or hiring a bonded, experienced pet sitter (with references) are contractual guarantees of safety and care for the pet. Professional services are less expensive than the potential consequences of negligence.

Prepare for the unexpected and maintain a fund for eventualities such as: • Major veterinary expenses. Also, accidents and health emergencies often occur on weekends or evenings when only emergency clinics are open. This is the costliest care.
• Repairs and installations (such as fencing), replacements (tile instead of carpet), and other onetime outlays making home and yard more pet-friendly.
• Moving next door may require only a pet deposit; moving abroad can add up with consular pet processing fees, veterinary certificates, animal cargo fees, and more.
• Legal actions due to alleged injury or property damage caused by the pet.
• Naming a trustee in your estate planning with access to funds sufficient to cover needs of the pet in the event of illness or death of the owner. This could include temporary boarding while a home is found, or pay shipment to a predetermined owner, or make a donation to a no-kill shelter to take in the pet and care for it while awaiting adoption.

It takes money to keep pets and the commitment to provide what is best for them. The third law of Pet Economics: Time and care given an animal is repaid a thousandfold.

Additional Source:  www.aspca.org/adoption/petcare costs.aspx

Protective Orders for People Expanded to Cover Pets

posted May 15th, 2011 by

By Lloyd Benedict

Over the past few years, I have written about the various legal means to protect our furry and helpless little friends, hoping to educate readers about how to maintain and protect their pets within the bounds of the law. It is a privilege to own a pet, and not a right. There are many animal laws that must be followed and consequences when they are not.

Despite the consequences, Tulsa has historically, in my opinion, been weak on law enforcement against the violators of animal laws compared to other cities in similar size throughout the country.
This inadequacy is not just my observation. Our lawmakers have known for many years that laws protecting animals ultimately require a slow process within the Courts to bring about protecting our pets, especially when the pets’ safety may require immediate action.

An example is the typical “mean neighbor” situation. You know the drill. The neighbor torments your dog and you finally decide to peacefully confront him to request an end to the abuse. The neighbor threatens you and your pet. Now fearing for your safety as well as your pets, you decide to call the police, but they are slow to respond because nothing has actually happened other than a threat. Now what? Another common scenario is when you are in a rocky relationship and you fear your significant other will become abusive to not only you but to your pet. Threats are made and you are now in fear of eminent harm. Now what? November 1, 2010, Oklahoma lawmakers addressed this problem when they amended the law to allow Protection Orders for human victims to include the victim’s pets. Oklahoma Protective Order Statute, Title 22 § 60.2, states: (edited for readability with the amended portion in bold) A. A victim of domestic abuse, a victim of stalking, a victim of harassment…

….The person seeking relief shall prepare the (protection order) petition or, at the request of the plaintiff, the court clerk or the victim-witness coordinator, victim support person, and court case manager shall prepare or assist the plaintiff in preparing the petition.

…The person seeking a protective order may further request the exclusive care, possession, or control of any animal owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held by either the petitioner, defendant or minor child residing in the residence of the petitioner or defendant. The court may order the defendant to make no contact with the animal and forbid the defendant from taking, transferring, encumbering, concealing, molesting, attacking, striking, threatening, harming, or otherwise disposing of the animal.

It appears that Protective Orders would not be issued solely to protect pets. The person seeking the Protective Order may “further request” the Court to include protection for their animal, following their belief that they are in danger of harm. It is then up to the Judge to hear the victim’s testimony and determine whether a real threat exists.
This statute incorporates the use of the Emergency Temporary Protective Order law which allows the victim seeking protection for them and their pet to possibly obtain immediate protection until the matter is heard before a Judge.

I contacted the Tulsa County District Court to learn how popular the added pet protection order has been. One of the judges’ clerks that handles protective orders said pet protection is becoming more frequent. She said one of the Judges has placed the name of the pet or pets in his order, providing specific protection for those pets. Additionally, she said the Judge is proactively asking victims (if not in the original request) if there is threat of harm against their pet(s).
The Tulsa District Court is not just looking out for us, but for our furry family members, too.

Over the past few years, I have written about the various legal means to protect our furry and helpless little friends, hoping to educate readers about how to maintain and protect their pets within the bounds of the law. It is a privilege to own a pet, and not a right. There are many animal laws that must be followed and consequences when they are not.

Despite the consequences, Tulsa has historically, in my opinion, been weak on law enforcement against the violators of animal laws compared to other cities in similar size throughout the country.
This inadequacy is not just my observation. Our lawmakers have known for many years that laws protecting animals ultimately require a slow process within the Courts to bring about protecting our pets, especially when the pets’ safety may require immediate action.
An example is the typical “mean neighbor” situation. You know the drill. The neighbor torments your dog and you finally decide to peacefully confront him to request an end to the abuse. The neighbor threatens you and your pet. Now fearing for your safety as well as your pets, you decide to call the police, but they are slow to respond because nothing has actually happened other than a threat.

Now what? Another common scenario is when you are in a rocky relationship and you fear your significant other will become abusive to not only you but to your pet. Threats are made and you are now in fear of eminent harm. Now what? November 1, 2010, Oklahoma lawmakers addressed this problem when they amended the law to allow Protection Orders for human victims to include the victim’s pets. Oklahoma Protective Order Statute, Title 22 § 60.2, states: (edited for readability with the amended portion in bold) A. A victim of domestic abuse, a victim of stalking, a victim of harassment…

….The person seeking relief shall prepare the (protection order) petition or, at the request of the plaintiff, the court clerk or the victim-witness coordinator, victim support person, and court case manager shall prepare or assist the plaintiff in preparing the petition.

…The person seeking a protective order may further request the exclusive care, possession, or control of any animal owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held by either the petitioner, defendant or minor child residing in the residence of the petitioner or defendant. The court may order the defendant to make no contact with the animal
and forbid the defendant from taking, transferring, encumbering, concealing, molesting, attacking, striking, threatening, harming, or otherwise disposing of the animal.

It appears that Protective Orders would not be issued solely to protect pets. The person seeking the Protective Order may “further request” the Court to include protection for their animal, following their belief that they are in danger of harm. It is then up to the Judge to hear the victim’s testimony and determine whether a real threat exists.
This statute incorporates the use of the Emergency Temporary Protective Order law which allows the victim seeking protection for them and their pet to possibly obtain immediate protection until the matter is heard before a Judge.

I contacted the Tulsa County District Court to learn how popular the added pet protection order has been. One of the judges’ clerks that handles protective orders said pet protection is becoming more frequent. She said one of the Judges has placed the name of the pet or pets in his order, providing specific protection for those pets. Additionally, she said the Judge is proactively asking victims (if not in the original request) if there is threat of harm against their pet(s).
The Tulsa District Court is not just looking out for us, but for our furry family members, too.

Lloyd Benedict is a principal in the Benedict Law Office, Tulsa, and is a member of the Tulsa County Bar Association Animal Committee.

Page 1 of 6123456