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Botanic Garden Dog Night is back

posted April 5th, 2017 by
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If you have not yet made the trek about 8 miles north of downtown to see the amazing sights at the Tulsa Botanic Garden, this is the perfect opportunity for any dog lover.

Thursday, April 6, will kick off the first dog night of the season at the Tulsa Botanic Garden, 3900 Tulsa Botanic Drive.

From 5-8 p.m., leashed dogs are welcome to explore the gardens with their owners. Dog Night

The Tulsa SPCA‘s mobile adoption unit will be on site with adoptable animals. PetsWell Pantry will be passing out samples of fresh, organic dog food and treats.

Dog Night will take place 5-8 p.m. the first Thursday of the month through August. Dogs must also be up to date on vaccinations and registration and only one dog per person. Please plan to clean up after your dog while visiting the gardens.

The event is free for Garden members and their dogs; Admission is $8 for ages 13+; $4 for ages 3-12; $4 per dog for non-members.

For those who attend be, sure to snap a pic of your pooch and send it to me at [email protected] for use in a future post.

-Lauren Cavagnolo, [email protected]

 

Supply and Demand

posted March 18th, 2017 by
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Supply and Demend

Supply and Demand

Supply and DemandThere is a direct correlation between supply and demand.  A long time ago, there were Cabbage Patch dolls.  My daughter was the target age at that time and, yes, her world included one of the dolls.  Were they overpriced – – yes; did they remain a collector’s item – no; did supply eventually exceed demand –  – yes.  The same philosophy applies to limited edition cars, trucks, jewelry, and clothing.  Yes I have one expensive purse.   Is the brand as expensive today as it was 10 years ago – – No, not even close.  The supply eventually outnumbered the demand, other purses caught the attention of women and today you can buy one of the purses at a reasonable price.

This correlation also applies to dogs and cats in rural Oklahoma.  There is a consistent over-supply of cute, adorable, big, little, fluffy dogs and sweet, purring cats.  Because the supply far outweighs the demand, their value in the marketplace is diminished in Oklahoma.  Thankfully for all of us involved in rescue, the demand outstrips the supply in other states.  As a result, every week hundreds of Oklahoma dogs (and many cats) find themselves in a van, the back of an SUV, or riding shot-gun – headed to their new home. 

An example is Miss Dixie and her puppies.  She was homeless.  Fortunately, for her and her puppies, she was rescued and gave birth at the Richardson Birthing Center. Fast forward several weeks.  Miss Dixie and her puppies arrived at Dumb Friends League in Denver, Colorado.  Within a week all of them (including Miss Dixie) had new homes.  They have a demand, we have the supply.

We are working very hard to diminish the over-supply.  Once that happens, Oklahoma dogs and cats will have a higher value.  We’re working very hard to make this a reality.

Sarge

posted February 25th, 2017 by
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Supply and Demend

Sarge

Sarge changed my life.  While I was at Second Chance Animal Sanctuary in Norman, they were (and continue to be) part of the Friends for Folks dog training program at the prison in Lexington.  I’d worked out an agreement with Lee, who ran the program, that he could select 3 dogs and we would get to give him one. 

Lee came into the facility, picked his three and I then took him to Sarge’s kennel.  He was met with growls – lots of growls – from a grumpy, irritated gray schnauzer.  Lee said “I’m not taking that dog”.  My response was “We had an agreement.”   It took a few minutes of convincing, but Sarge went to the training program.

Fast forward 6 months, the phones are ringing, dogs are barking and the cats are serenading.  Lee calls me and says something to the effect “We have a dog who is going to the Norman Veterans Center to be their resident greeter.”  I’m sure I responded appropriately.  Then he said “Do you know which dog?”  My answer “No”.  He said “Sarge”.  I know there were a few seconds of dead silence before I said “Sarge, are you sure it’s Sarge?”.  Yes it was Sarge.

We were also privileged to be part of the documentary The Dogs of Lexington.  You can go to you tube – type in the title and select the one by John Otto.  43 minutes long, so have your beverage of choice handy while you watch.  You will see Sarge at his grumpiest, his transformation under the care of Mr. Miller – an inmate- at the prison, and his triumphant introduction to the veterans at the center in Norman.

Then in 2015, the Oklahoma Veterinary Medical Association gave their “Hero Dog of the Year Award” to Sarge.  It still gives me goose bumps when I remember watching Sarge confidently standing on the stage, then a few minutes later he realized one of the veterans who was in attendance needed reassuring.  Sarge quietly went over to his wheelchair and jumped up in his lap so he could be petted.  Sarge just knew.

SargeToday, PAAS is involved with a training program at NOCC (Northeast Oklahoma Correctional Center).  We see the transformation in the inmates chosen for the program as well as the shelter dogs who live with them.  Programs like this change lives – – those of the inmate, their family, the shelter dog, those of us at PAAS who witness the transformation, and the lucky people who adopt a PAAS/NOCC graduate.

This is a picture of Sarge – – – – miracles do happen –  he’s one of them.

Kay Stout, Director

PAAS Vinita

[email protected]

918-256-7227

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Chiropractic care beneficial for pets

posted February 21st, 2017 by
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Holistic healthcare for our families, both human and furry members, continues to gain popularity. If you haven’t had a chance to read about Dr. Corinna Tressler and her work with acupuncture, be sure to pick up the January/February issue of Tulsa Pets Magazine or read it online.

Also falling under the umbrella of holistic healthcare is chiropractic care, an Eastern medicine approach that deals primarily with the mechanics of the spine and associated joints. Exams include adjustments or a short, controlled thrust by hand directed at a joint to improve function and motion.

Dr. Willa Weisel, DC, CAC,bonnie_dr_duree_shoulder_adj_236x300 is a doctor of chiropractic care who is also certified in animal chiropractic through the American Veterinary Chiropractic Association. Her practice, American Chiropractic Clinic, is located in Shawnee but she makes monthly visits to Tulsa, Oklahoma City and Norman.

Many pet owners who seek chiropractic care for their animals do so because of an injury.

“If you have a dog or a cat, you know they have a tendency to be very active and to jump on and off of things. And that very thing is what can be the start of repetitive stressor that leads to a real significant disability for them,” Weisel said. “It’s almost always the case that I don’t see that dog or cat or horse until the problem is so big that it is really disabling for the animal.”

Weisel is also involved with a variety of canine sports and will attend agility trials and other events to adjust dogs that become injured on the spot.

“If you have a dog that is involved with sports, agility, fly ball, discs, those types of things, they are athletes just like you and I are athletes if we are out playing volleyball or running track,” Weisel added. “So they need to get checked. They are going to have problems just from the repetitive stress exerting themselves in a physical nature like that.”

While chiropractic does not replace traditional veterinary care, it does offer a drug-free and noninvasive approach that can be used preventatively as a wellness tool in addition to treatment for existing problems.

“It should be a wellness treatment, a supportive treatment,” Weisel said. “We all have bumps and grinds, everyday.”

Though Weisel began her career focusing on chiropractic for people, her first animal adjustment happened by chance in 1988. A client who wanted her to adjust a foal born with an S-curve in its back approached Weisel and she agreed to take a look at the horse and give it a try.

“I went out there and this little horse was really cute. She couldn’t go backwards and she couldn’t go to the right and so she had kind of adapted to that,” Weisel recalled. “She had taken the horse several places and they had all advised her to euthanize the horse and she just couldn’t bring herself to do it. This little horse was not thriving though. She had diarrhea and she wasn’t processing food. I made one simple adjustment on her pelvis and it was so interesting … I can still see this blonde little horse, she turned around and she touched her nose right on her butt to the right and then she galloped off to the right and kicked her heels up and came back around.”

From that moment on, Weisel knew she would pursue expanding her practice to animals. Shortly after becoming certified through the AVCA, Weisel moved to Oklahoma and opened her practice in Shawnee in 2006.

In addition to the cats and dogs that visit her in the office, Weisel has had the chance to work with goats, sheep, a rabbit, a duck and even a llama.

“I was very much interested in pursuing that part of my practice and it has just grown and I love it,” Weisel said.

Weisel books appointments in Oklahoma City the first Saturday of the month, in Tulsa the third Saturday of the month and in Norman the second Tuesday of the month. To make an appointment, call 405-275-6363. You can learn more about Weisel and her clinic at drwillaanimalchiropractic.com or follow her Facebook page.

- Lauren Cavagnolo, l[email protected].

Adopt at Tulsa Animal Welfare

posted February 19th, 2017 by
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TulsaPets Magazine toured the Tulsa Animal Welfare shelter and took these pictures of adorable animals available for adoption. If you are thinking about a new family member, please consider saving the life of a homeless animal!

Visit the shelter and take home a new best friend!

Adopt at Tulsa Animal Welfare

LEARN MORE ABOUT TULSA ANIMAL WELFARE SHELTER

Make a difference – adopt a shelter animal!

All of these pictures were taken March 14th by Bob Foshay

The shelter is open to the public: Monday Noon – 5:00, Tuesday – Friday Noon – 6pm

and Saturday Noon – 4pm

Closed Sundays and some City holidays.

Dogs and cat adoptions are $75.00

Tulsa Animal Welfare Shelter   3031 N. Erie   Tulsa 74115   (918) 596-8000

This Week’s Wednesday’s Children available from the City of Tulsa Animal Welfare Shelter.   There are some beautiful dogs and cats for adoption so please go rescue one today! Rescued pets make the best companions!!!  A big “THANKS” is owed to Bob Foshay for doing what he does every week!

TAW

* Pictured Animals may no longer be available

A Better Life

posted February 17th, 2017 by
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Supply and Demend

TA Better Lifehe program at NOCC (Northeast Oklahoma Correctional Center) is a continuing reminder of a better life through the power of forgiveness that can happen between a person and a homeless dog.   We see it every week when we visit.

Google the following:  Pawsitive Change (a division of www.marleysmutts.org); celldogs.org (the original program started by Sister Pauline Quinn); go to youtube- type in The Dogs of Lexington (submitted by John Otto); and Camerado, I Give You My Hand.  This is a start to a journey that can be life-changing not only for the dogs, but especially for the inmates who train them.

With more than 61,000 inmates in the Oklahoma prison system, we have the second highest incarceration rate in the country; are prisons are at 119%+ capacity; and 77% of Oklahomans personally know someone who has been sent to a correctional facility. 

If you do further research on the internet, you will find countries that have low incarceration rates.  This translates not only into money saved, but the lives of their families.  Data proves 70% of the children who have one or more parent incarcerated will become one of the statistics.

We see the transformation of the inmates as we work with them. They learn compassion, how to give and receive love, confidence in training a high-energy, goofy, scared, big, little, four legged animal.  At the same time, they transform the life of the dog in their care.  Attend a graduation, witness the transformation, learn more about changing the outcome.  Ask anyone who works for PAAS – – we’ll be happy to regale you with true stories.  We believe in second chances.

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