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Home Veterinary Care brings clinic to your living room

posted October 19th, 2016 by
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Home Veterinary Care

Have you ever tried to take three cats to the vet? Or just one really stressed out cat? Maybe your large dog is sick and having trouble hopping into the car. Maybe your pet isn’t the problem, but your kid lost his shoes… again. Whatever it is that makes getting to the vet difficult, Tulsa’s newest mobile veterinarian can help.

Dr. Gabrielle Fielstra, who is also a mom to three young children, wanted to take charge of her schedule after working as veterinarian in a clinic for 10 years.

“I have thought about it for a while and it’s something I definitely think there is a need for here in town, ” said Fielstra, who launched Home Veterinary Care in June.

Many of her clients had pets that were stressed by coming into the clinic and had asked about home visits, says Fielstra.

Home Veterinary Care

Dr. Gabrielle Fielstra and vet tech Ashley Jones.

“It’s a lot more personalized,” she said. “I get to know my clients a lot better when I’m standing in their living room than in an exam room. And you can see the patients better; you can see them in their environment.”

For example, a limping dog may hide their injury in the clinic.

“The big thing is behavior, you can see the source,” Fielstra explained. “If a pet is going to the bathroom in the house, you can see their environment and what is going on with the litter box or the yard; things the client may not even think to tell you when they are standing in an exam room.”

Another service offered quality of life evaluations and end of life care.

“I can give my advice on the patient’s quality of life and if there is anything we can do to help improve quality of life or if it is time and help [clients] come to terms with that,” Fielstra said. “That’s the hardest part is getting to that point.

“We do a lot of referrals for home euthanasia,” Fielstra continued. “It’s a lot more comfortable. People are upset and they don’t want to be upset at a clinic in an exam room. We work with all of the pet funeral homes so we can help take care of the remains.”

Fielstra books her appointments in one-hour blocks allowing 15 to 20 minutes for travel, leaving 30 to 45 minutes for the actual appointment time.

Supplies are carried in the van including medications, a mini lab with microscopes and some basic tests. The exam is conducted in the house or yard if the pet is an outdoor animal.

“I think one thing that people hesitate on is the price; people assume it’s going to be really expensive,” Fielstra said. “We try to price it where it is still really reasonable.”

There is a travel fee separate from the exam fee. If you are having multiple animals examined, there is still only one travel fee. Package discounts for annual shots are also offered.

Home Veterinary Care serves Tulsa and the surrounding area Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, visit homevetcaretulsa.com or call 918.892.9382.

-Lauren Cavagnolo, [email protected]

Mutt Strut to benefit DVIS kennel

posted October 16th, 2016 by
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Mutt Strut

Bring your mutt out to strut his stuff and raise awareness for the DVIS kennel this Saturday at Hunter Park, 5804 E 91st St.

The third annual Mutt Strut starts at 9 a.m. and will include a .9 mile awareness walk and the first 100 dogs to arrive will receive a bag of treats from Bridges Barkery. There will also be a costume contest with a King and Queen of the Mutt Strut. There is also a chance to win best owner/dog duo.

Mutt Strut

Participants of last years Mutt Strut. Photo provided by DVIS.

DVIS or Domestic Violence Intervention Services, Inc. has been serving Tulsa for 40 years.

“As we took crisis calls and spoke with survivors we noticed that fear for the lives of pets was a common barrier that prevented families from seeking safety at our shelter,” said Carissa Bratschun, director of communication and marketing for DVIS.

According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, 71% of pet owners entering domestic violence shelters report that their batterer had threatened, injured or killed family pets. Additionally, it was found that 25% to 40% of domestic violence victims are unable to escape their abusers because they worry about what will happen to their pets should they leave.

DVIS was the first domestic violence shelter in Oklahoma to build kennels for dogs and cats.

“Before the kennels opened in July 2015, families would have to leave their pets behind or find other options to keep them safe,” Bratschun said. “We built the kennels to help our clients feel at home and to ensure pet safety was not a barrier to families seeking shelter with DVIS.”

The DVIS kennel can house up to two large dogs, three small dogs, three medium dogs and four cats. Pets staying with DVIS get shots, medicine and spay/neutering through spay Oklahoma. DVIS also provides food, bowls, leashes, collars, flea/tick medicine, toys, shampoo, blankets, cat litter, scoopers, litter boxes, etc.

Admission to the event is free with an in-kind donation to the kennel. Most needed items are: pet carriers; potty pads; pet first aid kits; flea and tick prevention; deworming medication.

Last year’s event filled two truck beds of in-kind donations for the kennels. “This year, we are going to have a moving truck and we hope to fill it to the brim!” Bratschun said.

You can register for the event at dvis.org or call 918.508.2711.

- Lauren Cavagnolo, [email protected]

Promises Made

posted October 9th, 2016 by
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Promises Made

PromisesPeople live longer and so do their pets.  Unfortunately, too often the pet outlives the owner and someone is left with a problem that has many options for a solution – only most of them are not realistic.

Families are frequently scattered hundreds of miles apart, have busy lives and do not feel they can take care of an elderly cat or dog that was the beloved pet of one of their parents or relatives.  When that is the case, it really helps all of us in rescue if a sibling or relative will make the necessary decisions regarding the pet’s future. Sadly, too often, that isn’t the case and it is left to a friend or neighbor.

There are no easy answers. But here are some facts that need to be considered.  Elderly dogs and cats are very difficult, if not impossible, to rehome.  Rescues are hard-pressed to find a good home for the puppies/kittens and young dogs/cats. When you call us and we listen, then explain why we can’t take the pet – it tears at our hearts.  But we also know, we have to be sure we save as many homeless dogs and cats as possible and the stark reality then means we can’t save all of them.

I can speak for PAAS and the 15+ rescues who now work with us – – we are saving 100+ dogs each month that are transferred to our partner in Colorado.  That keeps us going because we can see the positive impact it has.  We also know we can’t lose sight of that progress when faced with a phone call or conversation with someone who’s promised a friend/relative they would take care of their elderly pet, then realize it isn’t possible.

Social media can sometimes come to the rescue – especially Facebook sites.  But there’s no guarantee.  Plans and decisions should be made ahead of time – – for everyone involved.

Remember your pets have no voice – – you – – only you  – – are their voice.

Kay Stout, Director 

PAAS Vinita

[email protected]

918-256-7227

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Amoré Pits in Paradise

posted October 6th, 2016 by
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Amoré Pit Bull Rescue

Join Amoré Pit Bull Rescue next weekend for food, fun and games while raising funds for animals in need.

The only Pit Bull rescue in the Tulsa area, Amoré is dedicated to changing the conversation about Pit Bulls, educating the community about the breed and finding homes for their rescued dogs.

Misty Bilby, who founded Amoré in 2014. says sometimes when they are showing their dogs available for adoption, members of the public will sometimes comment that they are wasting their time.

“It’s really sad because they are really good breed,” Bilby said. “They are a very sweet breed of dog.”

Pits in Paradise will take place from 6 to 10 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 15 in OU Founders Hall, 4502 E. 41st St., and will feature a sit down dinner catered by Ludger’s, a silent auction and trivia.

Tickets are $50 and can be purchased in advance online at amorepitbullrescue.com/pip.

-Lauren Cavagnolo, [email protected]

 

Rib Crib raises $100,000 for Tulsa Charities

posted September 23rd, 2016 by
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Rib Crib

Rib Crib

Rib Crib’s 2016 Pitmasters Golf Tournament

Raises $100,000 for Tulsa Charities

Rib CribTulsa, Okla. – Rib Crib BBQ & Grill will present $100,000 to local Tulsa charities on Sept. 22 at 1p.m. at their company headquarters from proceeds of their 14th annual golf invitational, the 2016 Pitmasters Golf Tournament
In a new twist this year, Rib Crib chose not one, but five local non-profit organizations to benefit from the Pitmasters event. More than 140 golfers came out in support of The Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma, The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis, the Oklahoma Animal Care Foundation, the Tulsa Zoo and 12&12.

“We are excited to present the tournament proceeds checks to these wonderful community service and enrichment entities on behalf of all of our golfers, sponsors and employees,” said Bret Chandler, Rib Crib founder.

Representing each agency for the check presentations on Thursday will be Eileen Bradshaw, Executive Director of the Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma; Kacie Frazier, Program Director at The Children’s Hospital Foundation; Bob Poteet, Trustee of the Oklahoma Animal Care Foundation Board; Terrie Correll, CEO & President at the Tulsa Zoo Foundation; and Bryan Day, CEO of 12&12.

“Our vendors, sponsors and participating golfers’ generosity make these charitable gifts possible, but our Rib Crib employees and volunteers make the day the resounding success it was,” said Chandler. “We are proud and grateful for everyone’s contributions. We are honored to be able to give back to our community in this way.”

The tournament was held at the 18-hole Tillinghast-designed Oaks Country Club last summer, featuring a shot-gun start four-person scramble, hole prizes, an all-you-can-eat Rib Crib BBQ luncheon, and competitive live and silent auctions.
Rib Crib wishes to acknowledge the many contributors of financial, in-kind and services donations to make this tournament and community outreach possible. A special thanks goes to tournament presenting sponsor, Prosperity Bank.
Rib Crib vendors and major sponsors were Andreini and Company, Auto-Chlor Services, Tyson Foods, Saint Francis Health System, The Barkley Law Firm, Barcas, Dr. Pepper, The Holmes Organisation, Curtis Restaurant Supply, McCain Foods and Farmer Brothers. Top sponsors included Ventura Foods, Ben E. Keith Co., Decision Logic, Sweet Street Desserts, Jetlinx, Smithfield and UBS. A special thanks to our many hole sponsors as well as to Waller & Company Public Relations for publicity assistance.

About Rib Crib BBQ & Grill
With 61locations in eight states, Tulsa-based Rib Crib BBQ & Grill offers a fast casual environment and family-friendly menu featuring a wide variety of hickory-smoked meats served in sandwiches, dinners, salads and combination platters. Open daily for lunch and dinner, Rib Crib’s bold barbecue is perfect for dining in, carryout or catering. The Tulsa-based company with headquarters located at 4535 S. Harvard Ave. For more information about Rib Crib BBQ & Grill, or past tournament charities and team results, visit www.ribcrib.com.

About Rib Crib Tournament 2016 Causes –

The Community Food Bank of Eastern Oklahoma is the largest, private hunger-relief organization in eastern Oklahoma, providing food and other donated product to 450 Partner Programs in 24 counties of eastern Oklahoma and more than 346,000 meals to hungry Oklahomans each week.

The Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis was founded to welcome and foster charitable giving to and to provide and care for the special spiritual, emotional and physical needs of children and their families. Funds raised support pediatric care, programming and facilities for sick children, regardless of their ability to pay.

The Oklahoma Animal Care Foundation is committed to improving the health and welfare of animals in Oklahoma through education, public service and disaster response activities.

The Tulsa Zoo & Living Museum inspires a passion for wildlife in every guest, every day as one of the state’s leading wildlife education and conservation resources. Tulsa Zoo Management, Inc., a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, operates the zoo for owner the City of Tulsa. Funds from this event will help build a bigger, better zoo.

12 & 12 offers life-saving recovery tools for adults suffering with addiction or co-existing mental health and substance use disorders to achieve individualized recoveries. They are a leader in the substance abuse and addiction treatment and recovery fields and the largest non-profit addiction treatment facility in the four-state area.

Rib Crib

Blaze’s

posted September 22nd, 2016 by
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Blaze's

Blaze’s Tribute Equine Rescue

17667 Markita Dr.  Jones, OK  73049

(405) 399-3084 or (405) 615-5267

[email protected] www.blazesequinerescue.com

Federal I.D. 43-2024364

 

September 13, 2016

 

Blaze’s Tribute Equine Rescue, Inc. located in Jones, Oklahoma, is a non-profit 501(c)3 organization that strives to improve the lives of neglected, starved, and abused horses.  We provide equine rescue regardless of age or disability.  We promote and teach horse care and humane, natural methods of training horses.  Our primary focus is Animal Cruelty Cases.  We work closely with the Oklahoma City Animal Welfare Division and the Oklahoma County Sheriff’s Office with their Equine related Animal Cruelty Cases.  We also assist any other local/rural county sheriff’s office who request our assistance.

 

Rescues:

 

It continues to be a busy year with assisting several rural county sheriff’s office this year.  In our earlier newsletter we spoke about assisting Pottawatomie County and Blaine County Sheriff’s Office with 43 total horses and cattle.  Since our last newsletter, we have assisted Oklahoma City Animal Welfare Division, Okmulgee County Sheriff’s Office, Luther Police Department and Seminole County Sheriff’s Office. 

 

So far for this year, we have rescued 58 horses and 26 cattle.  We are asking for your assistance!  Any donation, big or small, is a huge help to our rescued horses.  We have a lot of outstanding Veterinary bills that we need to get caught up, as well as, our normal monthly expenses caring for these beautiful souls that were horribly mistreated by their former owners.  We have seen some extreme medical cases this year, from leg injuries that affected the joint or tendon which required profusions, eye injuries, crypt-orchid surgery, foundered horses, to our normal protocol of physical exams and blood work for our new arrivals that come from cruelty cases.  All these expenses add up quickly!  We believe that our rescued horses deserve the highest standard of care.  

 

Adoptions are also down and we are desperately asking for anyone interested in adding a horse to your family, to please come visit the horses in our program.  We are currently caring for 128 horses and have many nice horses that desperately need their forever, loving home.  The daily cost to care for these beautiful creatures can become quite taxing.  Any help you can offer would be greatly appreciated.  Every little bit helps tremendously!  We currently have 128 horses in our program.  Your generosity has helped us save over 1352 horses and 26 cattle.  We can’t thank you enough!  Here are just a few of our current rescues that need your support. 

 

 

 

McKenzie Rae came into our rescue program on August 07 2016.  McKenzie Rae came from the Okmulgee County Sheriff’s Office as a recommended owner surrender along with one other horse, Allon.  It certainly was a joint effort to get these two babies to safety.  I want to thank everyone involved.  What started out as a plea for help, became an investigation by Okmulgee County Sheriff’s Office and then a rescue effort collaborated by many animal rescue friends to help get these guys to safety.  A huge thank you to one of our amazing adopters/volunteers for taking the time out of your weekend to pick these guys up and safely transport them back to us.  The part about this story that we find disturbing is, Okmulgee County Sheriff’s Office, along with a local veterinarian stated these horses were not neglected but yet suffered from some other underlining issue.  The Veterinarian continued to state that McKenzie Rae was a danger to herself and others and that she declined treatment.  They claimed that McKenzie Rae was wild.  This sweet girl is far from wild and she was certainly too weak to put up a fight or “Decline Treatment”.  I was unaware that an animal could decline treatment. 

 

McKenzie Rae is estimated to be 10 months old.  She is by far one of the worst cases of starvation I have seen on a horse so young and still able to stand.  This sweet little filly is emaciated, body score of a 1, which is the lowest you can go, but I feel like she is a -1.  She had fly bites all over and covered in blood when she arrived.  The pictures just don’t do justice of how bad this sweet girl really is.  No horse should ever have a hip bone’s protruding to the point that it can be used to hang something on.  This just breaks my heart.  This special girl has a long road to recovery ahead of her.  We pulled blood for a CBC/Chemistry to make sure she wasn’t suffering from any underlying issues.  We found blood work to match a very neglected/starved young filly.  She became so weak immediately after she arrived, that she went down and we was afraid that we would lose her.  Our Veterinarian ran fluids and thankfully she was able to get back on her feet.  For the first week, we had to assist her on her feet.  She is slowly gaining strength.  We named her McKenzie Rae, as it means, “Hope for a New Beginning”, this sweet girl deserves a new and improved beginning.   Please consider making a donation towards McKenzie Rae’s Rehabilitation.

 

  Redneck, Choctaw, & Boston came into our rescue program on August 13, 2016.  These sweet boys came from the Luther Police Department along with 3 other horses, totaling 6 neglected horses.  We have six horses ranging from a body score of a 1 to a 3.  All are emaciated and infested with internal/external parasites.  Several had severe vitamin and mineral deficiencies and dehydration.  These sweet babies have gone without for far too long.  Each of these horses have a long road of recovery ahead of them.  Please consider making a donation towards The Luther 6 Rehabilitation.

 

Luna & Sol came into our rescue program on August 30, 2016.  Luna and Sol came from the Seminole County Sheriff’s Office as a recommended owner surrender.  Luna is just a baby herself, estimated at 4 years of age.  Luna is a beautiful Bay, Quarter Horse, Mare.  Luna needed a minor surgery, as when she came in, it appears that she had an old injury on her hoof that was never treated, therefore, appeared to have healed incorrectly and grew a secondary large mass off the side of her heal bulb.  It was successfully removed and she is healing nicely.  Sol is estimated to be around 4 months old.  He is a super cute, sorrel with a flaxen mane and tail, colt.  Luna is emaciated, body score of a 1.  It is clear she is giving all she has to her colt.  Sol is in decent shape, but could stand a bit more groceries.  Both are super sweet and love attention.  Luna has a long road of recovery ahead of her.  Please consider making a donation towards Luna & Sol’s Rehabilitation.

  

Hell hath no fury like a rescuer scorned!  We started freeze branding our horses in 2012.  I so desperately wish we had started way before that.  The reason for freeze branding our horses come in many forms.  One of my biggest reasons was due to the large number of rescues we have taken in and adopted out, many colors, sizes and breeds and many look alike.  But, let’s be honest, after you have rescued hundreds of horses, it becomes hard to identify each of them.  We do the best we can to keep an eye out for our rescued babies and make sure that they are continuously cared for in their adopted home.  Sometimes, our best just isn’t enough.  With all this said, imagine my anger when I realized that one of our former rescued horses, saved, rehabilitated and adopted out, and once again had to be rescued.  I can’t even begin to tell you the anger and sadness I felt looking into the eyes of a horse that I already saved and already promised a better future for.  But, what really angers me, is when an adopter signed a contract, agreeing to our terms of an adoption, takes it upon themselves to place that horse with another family, without notifying the rescue, without following the proper protocol to ensure the future and safety of that horse.  A horse that we spent hours of our time saving, hundreds of dollars making sure that the horse was properly rehabilitated.  That adopter put our rescued horse in danger, once again, without even giving a second thought of that contract or the organization that worked so hard to promise that horse a better future.  It is bad enough that a horse has to suffer neglect and cruelty once in their life, but twice?!  Yes, I am angry but I am also angry at myself.  I am angry that I trusted this adopter, I am angry that I wasn’t notified, and I am angry that this poor baby had to return here in the same condition he originally came to me.  We have rescued 1352 horses over the last 16 years and we have only had a handful of our horses land in a bad situation, thankfully, we have always managed to get them back here where they belong, but those handful still break my heart.  We are blessed with hundreds of wonderful adopters that make sure they do what is right for their adopted horse every day.  To those of you that have adopted and continue to provide for your babies, thank you from the bottom of my heart.  In the meantime, Seth is back here at the rescue and once again being rehabilitated due to the negligence of not only the original adopter but by the individual that neglected Seth and was seized by the Luther Police Department.  A huge thank you goes out to Luther Police for investigating this case and doing right by these horses.  Pictured below is Seth after original seizure in 2011 and second picture is Seth after second seizure in 2016.  He didn’t deserve this!

2011   2016

 

Adoptable Horse of the Month:

 

 GT Mystic Pistol is a beautiful, Registered Quarter Horse, Blue Roan, Mare.  She is estimated to be 4 years of age.  She has received some basic ground work and is ready to start under saddle.  She is a big, stout, beautiful girl!  She has a current negative coggins, up to date on vaccinations, deworming, teeth floating, and hoof maintenance.  Her adoption fee is $600.00.  Remember, our adoption fee’s go back into our program to help the next horse that comes to our rescue.  When you adopt a horse, you save 2 lives.  The one you adopted and the one you opened space up for a rescue to come in. 

 

  Hi Hopes is a beautiful, Bay/White, Paint, Pony, mare.  She is estimated to be 13 years of age.  Hi Hopes is 13 hands tall.  Hi Hopes recently went through Saddle Up Horsemanship’s training camp, where Kelci has 4 young students that aspire to be horse trainers.  Hi Hopes was paired up with Halle Barker.  Halle spent a solid week from 8:00 am till 5:00 pm working with Hi Hopes and preparing her for her forever, loving home.  Halle and Hi Hopes bonded quickly and she helped Hi Hopes come out of her shell.  Halle has done a lot with this sweet girl.  Hi Hopes would be a great lead line pony, pony party pony, or for any direction you want to take her.  She just needs a family of her own where she can bond and continue to excel.  Schedule an appointment to check this sweet girl out.  She would make someone an excellent addition to their family.  Hi Hopes has a current negative coggins, up to date on vaccinations, deworming, teeth floating and hoof maintenance.  Her adoption fee is $600.00.  Remember, our adoption fee’s go back into our program to help the next horse that comes to our rescue.  When you adopt a horse, you save 2 lives.  The one you adopted and the one you opened space up for a rescue to come in.    

 

Flo  Eddie

We also have some beautiful companion animal only horses that desperately need a retirement home of their own.  We have 2 super beautiful ponies, both blind that would love a forever home to call their own.  Flo, is a beautiful, Bay, Pony, Mare estimated to be 22 years of age.  Eddie is a beautiful, Black/White, Paint, Pony, Gelding, estimated to be 20 years of age.  Would you be interested in offering one of these sweethearts their retirement home?  If so, please contact us and come meet these sweethearts.

 

We have so many wonderful horses in our program, and so many with needs that ask for your assistance.  From horses with lameness issues that need treatment, to horses with severe fungus issues, eye injuries, emaciation, wounds, hernia surgeries, castrations, EPM treatment, squamous cell carcinoma, teeth floating, vaccinations, deworming, etc., our horses are our top priority and it takes a lot to properly care for so many rescued horses.  Whether you make a monetary donation, adopt a horse, or simply say a prayer for Blaze’s Tribute Equine Rescue, we truly appreciate your support.

 

Because of YOU and your heartfelt generosity, we are able to save these horses and many others from an uncertain death.  We ask for your assistance as we have so many more horses in our program that need your help.  Our average monthly expenses now total $8500.00.  If you can please help us, continue to save rescued horses, please make a donation to:

 

 

Blaze’s Tribute Equine Rescue

17667 Markita Drive

Jones, Oklahoma  73049

 

or you can donate on-line through paypal @

www.blazesequinerescue.com

 

Or you can contact our Veterinarian directly and apply a payment to our account

Exclusively Equine Veterinary Services at 405-973-5740

 

We are currently caring for 128 horses in our rescue program.  We have many wonderful horses that are seeking their forever, loving homes.  I hope that you will consider adopting a rescued horse.  Whether you are able to make a donation or adopt a rescued horse, both help us tremendously. 

 

               

Blaze’s Haunt for the Horses Benefit Trail Ride

 

You are invited to join us October 22nd, 2016 for our 7th Annual Blaze’s Haunt for the Horses Benefit Trail Ride at Honey Lee Ranch in Jones, Oklahoma.  You can learn more about Honey Lee Ranch at www.honeyleeranch.com.  Check in begins @ 9:00 am. Guided and Self-Paced rides will begin to leave at 10:00 am.  Lunch will be served at the pavilion at 12:30 and we are excited to announce a change in the menu.  This year we will have Sandy Creek Ranch smoking some brisket and ribs for our lunch.  The costume contest starts at 2:00 pm.  Come join us for treats on the trail, door prizes, drawing, and good times with friends.  All proceeds benefit the horses in our rescue program.  Pre-Registration is available, sign up today at: http://blazesequinerescue.fatcatphotos.com/trail-ride.  Registration covers T-Shirt, Lunch, and Trail Fee’s. 

 

6th Annual Blaze’s Ride to the Rescue Trainer’s Challenge

 

They say they can gentle an untrained horse.  The Challenge is an event designed to showcase the skills of local equine trainers, while increasing the adoptability of previously untrained rescue horses. 

 

Mark your calendars and plan to join us May 20th, 2017 at the Shawnee Expo Center, Shawnee, Oklahoma for our 6th Annual Blaze’s Ride to the Rescue Trainers Challenge.  We will be accepting applications for local trainers next month.  If you are a Horse Trainer and interested in competing in our 6th Annual Blaze’s Ride to the Rescue Trainers Challenge, please email [email protected] and request the application.

 

Do you want to learn more about our rescue efforts and how we operate?  We are thrilled to announce that our full documentary is now online to view.  Our documentary is 44 minutes long, there are moments of laughter, tears, and joy.  This documentary details our lives and how our rescue operates, from the seizures to the entrance of each horse to our rescue, all the way up to our fundraisers.  If you have a few moments to spare, please watch and share.  You can view our documentary here: https://vimeo.com/149973004?ref=fb-share&1

 

Thank you from the bottom of our hearts for your continued support!!  We wouldn’t be here today, without each and every one of you!!  Thank you on behalf of the entire Blaze’s Family!  So many horses would be lost without you! 

 

Over 1352 horses saved in the last 16 years!!