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Clear the Shelters Day

posted July 14th, 2016 by
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Clear the Shelters Day

 CLEAR THE SHELTERS DAY

THE TULSA SPCA AND OTHER AREA ANIMAL SHELTERS TO HOST 

TULSA, OK, JULY 8, 2016 — The Tulsa Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals is proud to announce its involvement in National Clear the Shelters Day on Saturday, July 23, 2016.

“We are so excited to coordinate this event again this year,” said Mindy Tiner, Tulsa SPCA executive director.  “Last year was such a great experience.  Many participating shelters and rescues had their largest ever number of single day adoptions!  This year we are excited to announce even more rescue/shelter participation than in 2015.  Rescue animals are usually no different from animals you’d get from any other source – with the exception that with every animal rescued you save two lives.  The one you rescue and the one shelters can then take in as a result.  This year has been such a tough year for the rescue community with the large number of hoarding, cruelty, unwanted litters and just general surrenders, we really want to use this opportunity to find forever homes for these animals that haven’t had the love and stability they deserve.”

This year marks the third annual event. National Clear the Shelters Day was started in 2014 by a group of North Texas animal shelters. In its first year, 38 North Texas Shelters adopted 2,273 animals. It was the first time cities, counties and nonprofit organizations joined forces to offer a unified campaign. In 2015, 118 animals were adopted by the Tulsa SPCA in its first year participating in the program.

Besides finding homes for shelter dogs and cats, the North Texas agencies hoped their first year event would encourage other shelters around the country to participate in National Empty the Shelter Day. Spearheaded by the Tulsa SPCA, 17 other Tulsa area agencies have signed on to reduce adoption prices on July 23. A list of these agencies and where they will be adopting out animals can be found at tulsaspca.org/clear-the-shelter.

“An estimated 11,000 animals are euthanized every day in the United States,” said Tiner. “We hope, on Clear the Shelters Day, the Tulsa community will join in with communities across the country and help us make a difference.”

By adopting from a shelter or rescue group, a dog or cat is given a second chance and the nation’s pet overpopulation problem decreases without the threat of euthanasia.

“Clear the Shelters Day is a great opportunity to come out and see how many beautiful animals rescue organizations and shelters have up for adoption,” said Jamee Suarez-Howard of the Oklahoma Alliance for Animals, one of the participating animal agencies. “We’re asking the community to come together and help us clear the shelters.  When you clear the shelters YOU are saving precious lives!”

What’s in Your Dog Shampoo?

posted July 7th, 2016 by
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What's in Your Dog Shampoo

What’s in Your Dog Shampoo? – Words of Wellness

By Emily Cefalo

 

Choosing a shampoo is an important part of your dog’s skin and coat health.

 

Well-known shampoos, such as Hartz Love Your Dog Shampoo, Miracle Coat Premium, Lambert Kay, Sergeant’s Fur-So-Fresh, Natural Research, and Pure Pet’s Pure Care, are among those without the ingredients listed on the label. So what kind of shampoo does your groomer use?

Before I became self-employed, I was amazed at how many groomers use Dawn soap on dogs. The risk of soap burning the skin and eyes is profoundly common. Shampoos containing sulfates, soap and parabens can cause a variety of skin disorders, not to mention they can be toxic and harmful. Even using human shampoo can cause reactions.

We want our pets clean, but we do not want their skin stripped of natural oils. There are many pet shampoos to choose from—just make certain you buy one that is gentle on your beloved pet.

Look for “soap and paraben free” and “pH balanced” when you’re shopping for a safe shampoo. Earthbath Mediterranean Magic is one of our favorites and is used on almost every dog. Another favorite used is Show Season Essential shampoo. We like the way it smells; it has aromatherapy and is infused with organic rosemary, olive and sunflower oil.

You always have the option to take your shampoo with you to your pet’s grooming appointments. If you aren’t sure what is used on your beloved pet, ask to take a peek behind the curtain to ensure your pet is getting the very best!

 

Wags & Kisses

Mia & Co. Pet Salon

Indoor vs Outdoor Cats

posted July 7th, 2016 by
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Indoor vs Outdoor Cats

Indoor vs Outdoor Cats

Indoor vs Outdoor Catsby Mira Alicki

Immediately one pictures packs of lions in Africa or a lone cheetah chasing down its prey. Cats are natural born explorers and hunters and domesticated cats retain that instinct whether they are raised outdoors or not. Many cat owners come to crossroads of having to choose what environment they want to raise their feline in: outdoors or indoors. If you are unsure of which option to choose, we’ve compiled a list to help with your decision.
Health

DISEASE. The biggest concerns for outdoor cats are feral and homeless cats that may come in contact your own. The American Feral Cat Coalition estimates that there are about 60 million feral and homeless cats living in the United States alone. Many of these cats carry a number of potentially fatal or dangerous diseases such as:

• Feline leukemia (FeLV)
• Feline AIDS (FIV)
• FIP (feline infectious peritonitis)
• Feline distemper (panleukopenia)
• Upper respiratory infections (or URI).

The first two listed, FIV and FeLV, are highly contagious and fatal. If your cat is going to spending any time outside, make sure you take them to get additional health care and vaccinations to protect against these diseases.

PARASITES. In addition to diseases, many outdoors attract fleas and bring them into the home. Even with a flea collar, cats may bring in parasites from the outside depending on their environment. Some other parasites that your cat may pick up during their outdoor exploration are:

• Ticks
• Ringworm (a fungal infection)
• Ear mites
• Intestinal Worms

These parasites not only cause moderate to severe symptoms to your feline but may also be spread to you and your family. Once a parasite has hitched a ride into your home, it is often times difficult to fully eradicate them from your home.

EXERCISE. The outdoors is the optimal environment for your cat when it comes to exercise. They are free to run wild and explore on their own. This also means getting fewer toys to keep them entertained indoors and less time spent helping them get the exercise that they need. Cats that spend all of their time indoors can become:

• Dependent on their owners for simulation: this can cause a cat to become stressed when the owners are absent and unable to entertain themselves.
• Clingy when they owner is home: this can cause a cat to become less welcoming to strangers or others who enter their home and take time away from their owner.
• Destructive to furniture: even with stretching posts and proper care, indoor cats may find expensive furniture to satisfy their needs and destroy them.

If you do allow your feline to venture outside, remember to:

• Protect your feline from other cats and animals. Keep them on a leash or let them out in a confined area like your backyard, where they are less likely to run into them.
• Keep a careful watch on your cat when they’re outdoors
• Periodically visit the veterinarian to screen for parasites and diseases and keep their vaccines up-to-date.
Safety

CARS. In addition to feral and homeless cats that can attack your feline, cars cause many feline deaths. A popular and false belief is that cats have an innate instinct to avoid busy roads and cars, which is completely false. Cats are just as likely to run into the busiest road as a dog is.

ANIMAL CRUELTY. For whatever reason, there are people like to inflict abuse to wandering animals. Any roaming cat is a risk to be attacked or shot with a BB gun or arrows. Some felines end up being trapped and then abused and/or killed “for fun.”

OTHER ANIMALS. Thanks to the reputation of larger felines such as lions and cheetahs, cats are considered to be exceptional hunters. While domesticated cats also make exceptional hunters, they often find themselves being the hunted, not the hunter.

Depending on your location, domesticated cats are at risk of being hunted by:

• Loose or stray dogs
• Coyotes
• Raccoons
• Foxes
• Crocodiles

Many bites from these animals are serious and can often lead to death. While you can’t control wild animals, you can control where your cat explores. Keep an eye on your feline and keep them in a safe and confined area.

TOXINS AND POISONS. Felines often come in contact with dangerous and toxic substances that are being used to kill off other pests. Common toxins that cats can come in contact with are antifreeze or rodent poisons.

TREES. In popular culture, cats are found in stuck high up in a tree and are often saved by some hero walking by. When these cats find themselves stuck high in a tree, the will be unable or too scared to climb down and end up staying there. If not rescued quickly, the cat can become severely dehydrated and weak that they end up falling with severe to fatal injuries.

Environmental

HUNTERS. Cats have a reputation for having such a strong prey drive that they often hunt just for sport and “for fun.” Their prey tends to be birds or other small animals. While the impact of one domesticated cat doesn’t seem that much, it is estimated that cats kill hundreds of millions of birds every year with feral cats only killing 20% of that number.
Indoor Cats

The main concern for indoor cats is their stimulation and exercise. As they spend the majority of the life inside the house, it falls upon the owner to provide both. Here are some suggestions to keep your indoor cat from becoming too fat and lazy:

• Get a companion for your cat: whether it is another feline or a dog, a companion will keep your feline company while you’re away while also providing exercise, affection and companionship.
• Interactive food toy: instead of just dumping food into their bowl, make your feline work for it. By putting the dry food inside a toy, they have to play with the toy to get the food out forcing them to exercise for their food.
• Scratching posts: avoid having your feline destroy your furniture by buying a post where they can satisfy their natural instinct to scratch at objects.
• Create the perfect environment: by buying items for your cat as cat trees, cat perches (that face the sun), and hiding places to provide simulation and comfort to your feline companion.

-Mira Alicki is a jewelry designer and goldsmith for the past 22 years. Her passion for animals led her to create her own line of jewelry and online store to benefit charities. 40% of each purchase is donated back to the animal community. You can find Mira on Twitter (@FIMHjewelry) or Forever In My Heart.

 

Botanic Garden offers two more dog nights

posted July 7th, 2016 by
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shutterstock_153925391

If you missed last month’s Dog Night at the Tulsa Botanic Garden, you still have two more opportunities to roam the garden with your best pal. Tonight and Aug. 4, the garden will be open late for dogs and their people to enjoy.

Between 5 and 8 p.m. enjoy a walk around the lake or in the A.R. and Marylouise Tandy Floral Terraces, dogs are restricted from the Children’s Discovery Garden. Complimentary dog treats will be available as well as wading pools for pooches to cool off!

Dogs must be current on all vaccinations and registrations and controlled by a leash (no retractable leashes). One dog per person, please. To keep the Garden enjoyable for all, please plan to clean up after your pup.

Free for Garden members and member dogs; Regular admission applies ($8 for ages 13+, $4 for ages 3-12, and free for children 2 years and under); $4 per dog for non-members.  For more information, call 918-289-0330. For map/directions, visit www.tulsabotanic.org.

Bo, the Botanic Garden dog.

Bo, the Botanic Garden dog.

– Lauren Cavagnolo, [email protected]

Open letter

posted July 6th, 2016 by
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Open Letter

Honorable Mayor Bartlett, City Councilors and Dr C Kunzweiler,

Tulsans continue to generate relentless numbers of cat and dog litters, inundating Tulsa Animal Welfare and

local private rescues and shelters for decades with unwanted and homeless animals.  Pet overpopulation creates

myriad problems for our city.

 

Litters have one source and only one source   —intact animals.

The tried and proven solution is so fundamental it is staring us in the face:  prevent litters in the first place with spay/neuter.

 

The only way to eliminate our pet overpopulation (and the need to impound/vet/shelter/adopt/foster/transfer/euthanize animals)

is spay/neuter.   Eliminate our pet overpopulation with community education, local affordable/available spay/neuter and

ordinance enforcement.  Funding spay/neuter programs rather than euthanizing animals is a much more prudent and humane

use of taxpayer dollars.

 

Respectfully,

 

Patty Mandrell

Tulsa

It’s Hot

posted July 5th, 2016 by
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Looking Back

It’s Hot – – It’s going to get Hotter

No matter how many ways we say it –

Don’t leave your pets in your car, truck, pick up, SUV, Jeep
– anything that has four wheels, a motor, and windows.

Dogs do not sweat. Let me repeat – – dogs do not sweat. They pant, vigorously, to say cool. When it is hot in a closed up car, their body temperature climbs quickly. Your quick stop at the convenience store, grocery store – – whatever – – will mean tragedy for your pets.

More and more states are passing legislation that makes it legal for a citizen to break a window to rescue an animal in distress. No Oklahoma hasn’t passed it yet. It’s a band wagon we should be on – – but we’re not.

The Fourth of July has come and gone. Rescues and municipal shelters have been inundated with lost, frightened, scared pets. Add to that the pets that will be left in locked cars – – – it is overwhelming for all of us who work in rescue.

Look at the picture – – look at your pet. Do the right thing when it comes to your mode of transportation and the animals who trust you.

Kay Stout, Director   PAAS Vinita  [email protected]  918-256-7227

It's Hot