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Dog Powered Scooter

posted January 11th, 2016 by
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Scooters2

Dog Powered Scooter!

We are different here and unsatisfied with the traditional way we road work and mush our dogs. We want more safety, steering control over the dog and better dog control. We want the system to be user friendly, thus easy and quick to hook up the dog/dogs, we are not interested in lots of dog training, and we want to use the system right from our homes and not have to drive out of town. And we wanted a system that most everyone can use. We’ve achieved these goals and more- dog powered mobility has become a practical reality.

Appropriate dogs for these systems are

- Young or middle-aged dogs

- At least 35 lbs. for single dogs and at least 18 lbs. each for multiple dogs

- High Drive. Athletic, Runners, Pullers, NOT RECOMMENDED FOR SPOOKY DOGS

- Reactive or even aggressive since the dog control is excellent but they can also run!

- Dogs that cannot be let off leash

- Blind and or Deaf Dogs- finally they can go full blast!

 Dog Powered

Over 2000 sold since I started back in 2005, with no injuries to dog or rider reported!

Caution: Urban dog mushing is a serious sport where safety for dog and rider is the first priority.   When starting out with a new dog, it is recommended you wear a helmet, gloves, and sturdy shoes.

Some dogs are spooked by the side to side restriction but most will “get it” in 1-3 sessions. AND you can prepare your dog early by hooking them up to things (like a kids wagon, an old tire, a concrete block or even a gallon jug of water), and under your supervision, pull that around the yard.

Considerations: Rider/dog weight ratio, outdoor temperature, water availability and extent of time on hard surface, are just some of the factors to consider. See our Safety Page for more details.

Only conscientious and caring dog owners need apply.

 

These rigs are NOT the only way to exercise your dog/dogs, just one great way and part of the mix.

This product deserves to have a worldwide distribution –  its more than urban mushing.

See contact info. below.

DogPoweredScooter.com

60285 Cinder Butte Rd., Bend, Oregon 97702

541-633-0680

[email protected]

Dumped to Die

posted January 11th, 2016 by
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Looking Back

Dumped to die is something that no one who loves animals will ever understand!  How can people can drive to a deserted place and put  a box of puppies on the side of the road …then drive away.  Or leave them next to a mailbox……by the railroad tracks……or in a dumpster.  For those who are in rescue, it causes high blood pressure, insomnia and anger management issues to name a few.

It may not be an epidemic in rural, northeastern, Oklahoma, but it sure feels and looks like it is.  How someone can look at themselves in the mirror, face their family and live with the memory that they sentenced innocent puppies to death – – – puppies who had no voice – – who were born because oh dear lord we can’t spay our momma dog and we sure aren’t going to neuter our male.  SERIOUSLY!!!!  Then you take care of the offspring, raise them yourself and provide for them.  But do not dump them!!!!

There is an organization,  The Link Coalition, which tracks animal, child and spousal abuse.  There is a connection between the three.  Oklahoma has a high percentage of child abuse and spousal abuse per capita ratios.  If we tracked dumped, abandoned dogs we would be shocked.

The answer – is spay/neuter.  If you have a litter of puppies that need a home and you’re not willing to get the mother dog fixed, I have no words to describe how angry/sad that makes all of us who, every day, look into the eyes of scared, homeless dogs and work tirelessly to find them new homes.

I’ve said it before – I’ll say it again.  Oklahomans make a difference!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Kay Stout, Director 

PAAS Vinita

[email protected]

918-256-7227

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It’s Never Too Late

posted January 7th, 2016 by
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What's in Your Dog Shampoo

It’s Never Too Late – A Cat Tale

by Camille Hulen

Asshe lay dying, and could no longer speak, my friend penciled a note to me: “Please take care of my cats.” We had discussed this before, and I knew them   well: a young, mischievous Maine Coon, a middle-aged black male, and a 15-year-old black female. She had loved all animals, and these cats had been an important part of her life. They were her family since she had no human heirs. I was honored that she trusted me with her most valued possessions.       The Maine Coon was adopted very quickly, but I knew all too well that black animals  are difficult to place. Fortunately, the black male was placed eventually, but I was afraid that April, the “old girl,” would be with me forever.

April stayed in my kennel, and, at first, was very persnickety in the way she would allow anyone to touch her. She was declawed, so her first impulse was to bite. However, she mellowed with time and grew quite attached to me. She would dash into my office at every opportunity and became very fond of hanging out in my black office chair. Many people admired her, but no one wanted a “black” cat, especially an “old black” cat!

But recently, I was surprised to receive an email from a friend who had talked with someone wanting a black cat! It seems that this person’s 90-year-old mother was mourning the recent loss of her black cat. But the son was very specific; he did not want an old cat because he had recently spent thousands of dollars on veterinary care for the other cat. Well, April would not be the cat for them, but I knew of other black cats needing homes, so I invited him to visit.

Without hesitation, the son, D.J., came to meet whatever black cats I might show him. It so happened that April was in my lap when he arrived. As he sat in the chair opposite me, April got onto the desk to see him. He looked at her and said, “That looks just like my mother’s cat!” I guess April sensed that, for she promptly went over into his lap, started purring, and gave him a kitty kiss.

As I told him more about April’s story, I mentioned how she liked to sleep in my black chair, “black on black,” and was often nearly sat upon. He exclaimed, “My mother has a black chair just like that! Our cat always slept in it!”

Then we proceeded into the kennel. The first thing he spied was my father’s WWII army trunks. “We have one of those trunks!” he said, shaking his head. “My mother was a WWII army nurse.” He viewed other cats and talked to them gently, but his mind returned to April.

We then drove to another location where there was a younger black cat needing a home. As we left my driveway, another coincidence occurred. I have a black metal cat silhouette at the end of the drive, and guess what? There’s a similar one at their home!

We arrived at our destination and looked at several other cats who responded well, but the black cat I wanted him to see remained hidden under the bed. As he had time to think without pressure, there was no question in his mind. April was the black cat for his mother! I explained he could return April if it didn’t work out, but after searching for the right cat for several months, there was no doubt in D.J.’s mind.

When April arrived at her new home, she went immediately to sit in her new mom’s lap. She stayed with her all evening, except for a brief supper, which she ate heartily. No adjustment period necessary. And at bedtime, of course, she went to bed with Mom. April was home.

As of this writing, Mom and April are passing their days happily. April wakes her faithfully at 6 a.m., demands breakfast, and they then sit contentedly together by the window to watch the birds.  April frequently runs through the house like a kitten, enjoying one of her toy mice, and has her own special ottoman where she can nap peacefully if she gets bored with Mom’s game of solitaire. What could be a better match? A 19-year-old cat for a 90-year-old woman!

Coincidentally, on the very day that April found her new home, another friend forwarded me an email.  I had not yet shared April’s good news with her. The story was about a 102-year-old lady in Texas who had adopted a senior cat because she was lonely. The picture showed her hugging her new “furrever” friend. Yes, it’s never too late for love!

Pets for the Elderly

posted January 6th, 2016 by
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Pets for the Elderly

Pets for the Elderly

by Barbara Ballinger
from AgingCare.com

For elderly pet owners, who often live alone or in group facilities, pets can help reduce stress, lower blood pressure, increase social interaction and physical activity and help them learn.

“A new pet can stimulate someone to read up on an animal or breed, which can be very mentally stimulating and important at that age,” says Dr. Katharine Hillestad, a veterinarian with the office of Doctors Foster and Smith in Rhinelander, Wis., which provides online advice and retails pet supplies and pharmaceuticals.

Pets provide other intangibles. “Dogs—and other pets—live very much in the here and now. They don’t worry about tomorrow. And tomorrow can be very scary for an older person. By having an animal with that sense of now, it tends to rub off on people,” says Dr. Jay P. Granat, a New Jersey psychotherapist.

And pets can reduce depression and lessen loneliness. “Older pet owners have often told us how incredibly barren and lonely their lives were without their pet’s companionship, even when there were some downsides to owning an active pet,” says Linda Anderson, who with husband Allen founded the Angel Animals Network in Minneapolis. The couple speaks about the joys of pet ownership and has authored books.

In Angel Dogs: Divine Messengers of Love (New World Library, 2005), the Andersons tell about Bonnie, a golden retriever Marjorie and Richard Douse adopted, which became an indispensable family member. “We never felt alone when Bonnie was in the house. As we aged and tended to go out less, she provided us with loving companionship,” the Douses say in the Anderson’s book.

Psychologist Penny B. Donnenfeld, who brings her golden retriever mix Sandee to her New York City office, has even witnessed her ability to rev up elder owners’ memories. “I’ve seen those with memory loss interact and access memories from long ago,” she says. “Having a pet helps the senior focus on something other than physical problems and negative preoccupations about loss or aging.”

Pets benefit, too, particularly when older folks adopt older pets. “These lucky pets go from the pound to paradise. Since most of the adopters are retired, they have lots of time to devote to a previously unwanted pet,” says Chicago veterinarian Tony Kremer, who with his wife Meg operates Help Save Pets—Humane Society, which operates adoption centers.

Here are some things caregiver’s should consider when purchasing a pet for their senior mom or dad.

Right pet for the right owner. But because people age so differently, the decision needs to be made carefully—and not just by grown loving children who think it sounds like a way to provide camaraderie. Because there’s no single right pet, ask the following questions to help narrow the field, says Dr. Donnenfeld.

Are you set in your ways? If you don’t like change, you may not be a good candidate, say the Andersons.

Have you had a pet before? Amy Sherman, a licensed therapist and author ofDistress-Free Aging: A Boomer’s Guide to Creating a Fulfilled and Purposeful Lifethinks it’s best if the elderly person is an experienced owner.

Do you have disabilities? Dogs can be wonderful companions who encourage a senior with no major physical limitations to walk and interact with others, Dr. Donnenfeld says. For those who are physically challenged, cats often need less care than dogs, she says. A small dog that’s paper-trained or an indoor bird is also sometimes preferable, she says.

Do you need a therapy pet? If the person is very infirm or impaired, they may be a candidate for an assistance or therapy dog to help them function or interact.

Is the pet the right age? A puppy or kitten may not be the best choice for elderly owners because of the care they require. A young pet may outlive its owner. Birds especially have long life spans. Yet, it’s also important that the pet isn’t too old since it may start to have physical limitations and get sick, Dr. Donnenfeld cautions.

Does the pet have a good temperament? Although some older owners may think a Great Pyrenees would be too big to handle, Daffron found one mixed two-year old so mellow that it would have been a good pet for a senior. “Many older people might think they’d do better with a Jack Russell terrier because it’s small but they are very, very, very high energy and require more effort and commitment. So much depends on personality,” she says.

Is the pet healthy? It’s important that any pet be examined by a professional. “You don’t want to compromise an older person’s immune system since some pets carry diseases,” says Dr. Hillestad.

One pet or two? While multiple pets can keep each other company, that may not be a good idea for an older person, says Dr. Hillestad. “Two puppies may bond with each other rather than with the owner,” she says.

Are finances an issue? Pets cost money. A small puppy can run more than $810 its first year for food, medical care, toys and grooming while a fish is less expensive–about $235, according to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. If the pet takes ill, dollars snowball. Groups are available to help allay costs.

Susan Daffron, author of Happy Hound: Develop a Great Relationship with Your Adopted Dog or Puppy (Logical Expressions, 2006), has taken pets to nursing homes through shelter outreach programs. “I go down halls and people will say, ‘Oh, this looks just like my dog,'” she says. She has also helped elderly folks adopt the right animal. One woman, 86, wanted to be able to walk a dog but didn’t want a hyper pet. “She was good at judging her limitations,” Daffron says.

Angie Jones became interested in training therapy dogs after bringing her dog Hunter to visit her late father in a retirement home. “It took us half hour to get to my dad’s room because everyone stopped us along the way and wanted to pet the dog and tell me about their dog,” she says. “Hunter brought my father great joy and opened the door of communication since he was more of a recluse,” says Jones who started Central Ohio Good Shepherds, a chapter of Therapy Dogs International Inc.

Where to find the pet. While breeders are a good source, some shelters also provide a pet for less and offer the advantage of rescuing it from euthanasia. Purina Pets for Seniors partners with 200 shelters nationwide to provide seniors pet adoptions at a reduced cost (www.petsforpeople.com). Local services also exist such as Paws/LA in Los Angeles (www.pawsla.org).

Shelter employees often know the pet’s personality well and can make a good match, says Daffron. Online pet shopping is also possible, thanks to sites like www.petfinder.com, which pairs owners with 250,000 adoptable pets from 11,000 animal and rescue groups nationwide.

How to provide care long-term for a pet. Because an older owner may take ill or die, it’s important that the pet is provided for in a will and a caregiver named, says Dr. Hillestad. Even more basic is that someone knows that an elderly person has a pet. “If the person is rushed to the hospital, it could be left alone if nobody knows,” says Allen Anderson.

Read more about: elderly companion

Pets and Seniors: Avoiding Painful Separation

posted December 29th, 2015 by
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Seniors and Pets

Pets and Seniors

 

Last Updated: April 2, 2013 Pets and Seniors

By Steve Duno

For generations, pets have been a part of the fabric of our lives, keeping us company and providing us with steadfast, loyal devotion. Most of us have felt their unconditional love, and the sheer joy that comes from having a best friend who accepts us for who we are, faults and all, in an uncomplicated, mutually satisfying intimacy. Pets just make people feel happy.

Enjoyed by over half the households in the country, pet ownership is especially common amongst seniors, who, often living on their own, find the company of a good cat, dog, bird, or other pet to be of great comfort. The bond they develop with their pets can be deep-seated; indeed, the elderly’s closest confidants often walk on four legs rather than two.

THE TRAUMA OF PET SEPARATION

When the decision is made to move an elderly loved one to an assisted living facility, the fate of that strong pet/owner bond can become a major issue for the senior. “What on earth will happen to my friend?” is sometimes their biggest concern, often even above and beyond their own welfare. And some seniors, though relieved by the surrender of caring for a pet, can become remorseful over it; ironically this can mirror the mindset of their own families, who too may feel guilty over the senior’s move to the assisted-living environment.

The deteriorating health of our elderly, besides being the major motivator for a move to an assisted- living facility, can also adversely affect their pets. No longer able to go for regular walks, seniors aren’t able to properly exercise their dogs, or attend to basic pet needs such as feeding, cleaning up, and taking the pet in for a veterinary checkup. Those without the ability to drive or use transit can no longer get to the store for pet food and other supplies. And if the pet is a large, healthy dog, the senior might even get hurt trying to manage or control it. Though smaller pets such as cats or birds pose less of a problem, the ability to care for them properly is still diminished, often to the detriment of the pet. Clearly, when fading health becomes an issue, the pet/owner bond suffers.

THE BENEFITS OF PET OWNERSHIP

Despite the elderly pet lover’s diminishing capacity to care for his or her pet, studies show the health benefits of regular contact with an animal to be significant, especially for the aged. Contact with a dog, cat, or other pet has been clinically shown to lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and to reduce the incidence of depression as related to failing health and fading autonomy. Pets help reduce boredom and feelings of hopelessness, and instill in the owner a sense of purpose born from being accountable for the welfare of an animal. Fewer doctor visits are reported, and aerobic activity levels tend to rise. In addition, caring for the pet becomes an “events calendar” of sorts for the senior, who without the pet would have precious little to do during the day. The pet provides a sense of obligation and duty, acts as a social catalyst, and gives the elderly owner someone to talk to and confide in. For all pet owners, but especially those in failing health, a pet can literally add years of health and happiness.

DEGREES OF PET SEPARATION

The good news is that most seniors today need not be denied the company of a pet, even when relocated into an assisted-care facility. First, as per federal housing laws, publicly-run facilities cannot prohibit pet ownership by residents,provided they are able to care for the pet. This would allow the pet/owner relationship to continue as long as the pet is adequately trained and socialized, and does not pose a threat to other patients. Though private facilities need not abide by these same federal laws, many still do allow pet ownership on varying levels. Staff and family providing elder care support can assist the patient when needed, with feeding, walking, and other pet-related duties. Patients with a good degree of autonomy are often fully able to care for a pet, especially when the living arrangement closely mirrors a normal home environment.

“Many homes allow pets on the premises,” says Michelle Cobey, spokesperson for the Delta Society, a Bellevue, Washington volunteer organization that helps incorporate pets into the lives of the ill, elderly, or disabled. “But sometimes it can be difficult to manage without help from the staff, or from volunteer case workers.” Cobey’s organization specializes in sending volunteers and their well-mannered pets into managed-care facilities, and in helping the elderly care for any resident pets on hand.

Resident pets don’t always work out well though, especially when the senior in question has a dog evidencing territorial behavior. If the resident does not properly socialize the dog with other patients, the animal can become overly-protective and guarded. This is especially common with the dog of an elderly owner, as it can sense its master’s failing health, and often compensates with increasing protectiveness.

“It usually works out better to have one resident-shared pet at the facility than to have many individually cared-for pets, especially dogs,” says Ron Baker, administrator at the North Creek Health and Rehabilitation Center in Bothell, Washington. “That way you avoid territorial issues that can lead to injury or trauma.” Baker adds that pet care volunteers are always welcome at his facility, to bring in pets or help with ones at the center.

PET SEPARATION ALTERNATIVES

If the senior cannot adequately care for a resident pet, family members can bring the animal into the facility for regular visits, rules permitting. Or, volunteer organizations such as the Delta Society, Pets On Wheels, Therapy Dogs International, or dozens of others can be called upon to send their legions of volunteers to facilities all across the nation, bringing with them friendly dogs or cats to delight both residents and staff. Trained to help seniors, children, hospital patients, and the cognitively impaired to enjoy interaction with gentle, loving pets, these volunteer visits are often the highlight of a pet-loving resident’s entire week.

In some cases, when the family or senior is unwilling or unable to care for a pet, it may have to be surrendered to a shelter for placement with another family. This pet separation can be devastating or liberating to the pet lover, depending upon the outcome. With a well-funded “no-kill” shelter in charge of placement, though, most healthy adult dogs have a good chance at finding a new home, especially if the pet is well-behaved and sweet. National organizations like the SPCA and the Humane Society, as well as countless quality regional shelters can all help with the difficult task of finding the appropriate home for a good pet whose owner can no longer care for it.

“Often it’s a last-minute decision made not by the elderly resident, but by the family,” says Judith Piper, director of Old Dog Haven in Arlington, Washington, dedicated to finding homes for older dogs often surrendered up by the elderly. “Often I find the physical and mental condition of these dogs mirrors the condition of the elderly owner, who might be suffering from reduced cognitive capacity. A dog’s poor hygiene and worsening physical and behavioral state is often a clue to the owner’s inability to care for it. Families can get a good feel for their loved one’s state of mind by noticing any health or behavior problems in their pets.” Piper adds that, if a family or resident plans to surrender a pet up for adoption, it is essential to provide the shelter with pertinent veterinary records, especially if the pet is old.

If the pet is being cared for in a managed care facility by a resident, certain practices can be taken to make caring for the pet easier. With a cat for instance, the litter box needn’t be located on the floor, where it might be difficult for the senior to access. Better to locate it at waist height on a counter, where the resident can easily attend to it. For walking a dog, residents can use a halter-type collar instead of a traditional neck collar, to prevent pulling on leash. The halter collar fits on the pet’s face like the bridle of a horse, and makes leash control nearly effortless. The same goes for a bird cage; place it at the appropriate height and location so the resident can access it easily. All food, litter, and pet supplies should be easily accessible and light enough not to cause strain. Buying smaller bags of food and litter can prevent muscle strains and back injuries. And for medical concerns, consider having a mobile veterinary service visit the facility, instead of requiring the senior or a family member to make a trip.

With proper family help, institutional elder care support, and volunteer assistance, our elderly loved ones need not deny themselves the elixir of the pet/owner bond. It can continue on, helping to motivate and inspire them for years to come, providing the love and good cheer they so deserve.

Veteran pet behaviorist and authorSteve Dunolives in Seattle with his family and an ever-changing assortment of rescued pets, and has authored seventeen books and numerous articles for magazines and the Internet.

RELATED RESOURCES

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PAAS 2015

posted December 29th, 2015 by
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Looking Back

2015 has been a year of firsts for PAAS.

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PAAS opened our doors on April 17th 2015.  By May 17th it was clear we needed to implement a plan B in order to save the homeless dogs and cats in our area.Plan B was transport out-of-state.  Thanks to Denver Dumb Friends League, Boulder Valley Humane Society and Cheyenne Animal Welfare 255+ dogs have found new homes.  Cats – – we’re still working on a solution – – it may be The Netherlands!!!

Miss Ruby is first on the video – she was our first rescue (pregnant – sick – malnourished).  Her puppies quickly found homes in Wyoming.  Miss Ruby now lives the life of luxury in Enid, OK.  Our fantastic volunteers, Tom & Vicki, established the Richardson Birthing Center – the go-to place for all our pregnant dogs.

We’re busy, we’re saving lives and we’re so grateful for all the financial support – –

Watch the video – – support our mission – – help us save lives.

http://tinyurl.com/zmqzrmw                Donate Now

Kay Stout, Director   PAAS Vinita  [email protected]  918-256-7227