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The Nitty Gritty on Nail Trims

posted October 10th, 2015 by
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The Nitty Gritty on Nail Trims

Pups and Pedicures

By Nancy Gallimore, CPDT-KA

 

Get a pedicure?

You don’t have to ask me twice. Why, yes, I would love to have someone pamper me for an hour or so. Count me in.

Ask the same question to just about any dog? You might as well ask him if he’d like to be abandoned in a desert filled with wild animals and broken glass. The mere hint of a nail trim will generally result in a mixed look of pained shock and brimming terror clouding a dog’s normally trusting eyes.

And yet, keeping nails properly trimmed is important to the overall health and welfare of your dog. According to Dr. Patrick Grogan, medical director at VCA Woodland East Animal Hospital, nails allowed to grow too long can actually alter the way a dog plants his foot, causing discomfort, and potentially even a lack of desire to exercise properly.

Another risk of neglecting trims is that longer nails are more likely to snag on things, potentially causing the nail to break off into the quick, the fleshy cuticle inside the dog’s nail. Not only is this painful for your dog and potentially quite messy for you, there is a healthy blood supply in the quick. Dr. Grogan says that if a portion of the nail is still attached or the cuticle is exposed, the dog may have to be anesthetized so your veterinarian can treat the injury.

“Most dogs should have their nails trimmed about every six to eight weeks,” advises Dr. Grogan. “This can vary depending on the size and activity level of your dog. The nails of smaller dogs or less active dogs may grow out faster than larger, active dogs that get a lot of normal abrasion and wear on their nails.”

Dr. Grogan also says that regular trimming is required to not only keep a dog’s nails a good length but to also keep the quick from growing out too long. If nails are neglected and the quick is allowed to grow out, it can be very difficult to return the nail to a  proper length.

If you want to learn how to trim your dog’s nails yourself, Dr. Grogan suggests taking some time to familiarize yourself with the anatomy of a dog’s nail.  The fleshy, tender quick is wedge-shaped and follows the contour of the nail itself, almost like a smaller nail inside the nail.

“The part of the nail that can be safely trimmed generally hooks down a bit and is thinner at the point where it clears the tip of the quick,” Dr. Grogan says. “Ideally, you want to trim the nail two to three millimeters from the tip of the quick.”

If you are lucky and your dog has light colored nails, you can actually see the pink quick inside the nail. If your dog has black nails, it’s a bit trickier. Dr. Grogan suggests snipping just a little at a time.

If your dog will accept it, you can also use a grinder to smooth the tip and edges of the nails. If your dog’s nails are very long, trim them back first and then use the grinder to smooth the edges. Be sure to keep the grinder moving, just lightly tapping the dog’s nail. The sandpaper and friction get very hot if held to the nail surface too long and can cause discomfort.

OK, it’s one thing to know how to trim your dog’s nails, but it’s another issue to convince your dog it’s a good idea. Well, my certified-professional-dog-trainer take on  the situation is that with nail trimming, and many other important grooming tasks, we tend to take an ill-advised all-or-nothing, grab-‘em-and-force-‘em-to-accept-it approach with our puppies and dogs. Obviously, this is not the best of plans for the long haul.

Dr. Grogan and I agree that while most dogs do not naturally like to have their feet handled, you can teach them to accept nail maintenance with graceful resignation (don’t go so far as to expect tail-wagging joy). The key word here is “teach.”

It’s a great idea to spend some time prepping your dog for the idea of a nail trim. If you grab the dog and start issuing commands, pinning your dog to the floor, and grabbing his feet and trimming away, my guess is that you’re going to be met with some serious resistance that will get worse with every attempt.

But if you teach your dog to accept a nail trim in a positive fashion, it doesn’t have to be a battle. Think about it: if you go in for a pedicure, the technician doesn’t just grab you, pin you to a chair and start trimming your toenails. I know my pedicures start with a relaxing foot bath… a little massage… the offer of a cool beverage.

While your dog doesn’t necessarily need that level of spa pampering (or does he?), it’s a good idea to have your dog relax on the floor beside you while you give belly rubs and lightly touch each paw, rewarding with treats as you do so. The idea is to give your dog a very calm, positive experience in conjunction with having his feet handled.

The next step would be to touch the nail clippers to each toenail with plenty of calm praise and rewards sprinkled throughout  the process. When you feel ready to start trimming nails, Dr. Grogan offers some   great tips:

Purchase good nail clippers. You may want to ask your local pet supply store for recommendations.

With your dog in a calm environment, trim just one foot per day over the course of four days. Keep it short and sweet. Don’t rush the process.

Offer lots of treats and praise after each snip.

Enlist the aid of an assistant. One person distracts the dog and gives treats while the other person trims the nails.

If you do accidentally trim a nail too far back and see blood, don’t panic. While nails can bleed impressively, Dr. Grogan says it is not cause for huge concern. You can apply pressure for a few minutes, or you can apply a clotting powder like Quick Stop if you have it on hand.             Dr. Grogan says you can even just let your dog go relax outside or in an area where a little blood won’t be a problem. The nail should clot within 10 to 15 minutes.

In the event that you do cut into the quick, the trainer’s note here is to also try not to make it a big issue with your dog. Don’t panic and apologize like a crazy person. Talk calmly, reassure your dog and offer a good jackpot of treats to make amends for your mistake. Then take a break and try again in a day or so.

If you still feel a bit squeamish about diving in, ask your veterinarian to show you how to trim your dog’s nails. “We are always happy to show owners proper nail trimming techniques,” says Dr. Grogan.

If you aren’t willing and/or able to trim your dog’s nails yourself, there is no shame in leaving the procedure to the professionals. Your veterinarian will always be happy to give your dog a nail trim, or you can use the services of an experienced, professional groomer who will work with your dog to help him accept a little pedicure. When the pros are on the job, the trim is generally over before your dog even realizes what is happening.

If you have a dog who has had a previous bad experience during a nail trim, or one who is overly sensitive about having his feet handled, you may want to enlist the aid of a qualified dog trainer to work with your dog. A good trainer can help condition your dog to accept different types of handling and grooming procedures in a positive manner.

The overriding lesson is this: you teach your dog where to potty; you teach your dog what to chew and what not to chew; you teach your dog basic cues like sit, down, and to come when called. The teaching must continue when it comes to basic maintenance routines such as nail trims.

With a little work, a little patience, and perhaps a good number of hotdogs, you (or your veterinarian/groomer—it’s OK to bail) can give your dog a perfect pedicure. Keep calm and trim on.

Pet Life Hacks

posted October 3rd, 2015 by
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Pet Life Hacks

Making Life Easier

 

Who couldn’t use some shortcuts to make life easier? Simple, everyday tips right under your nose that you just haven’t thought of are also now at your fingertips if you know how to use a computer keyboard.

Enter the “life hack .” Thanks to websites like BuzzFeed, Pinterest and tens of thousands of blogs, you can read life hack lists for hours—mind blown. Oxforddictionaries.com defines a life hack as “a strategy or technique adopted in order to manage one’s time and daily activities in a more efficient way.”

We’ve sifted through a few hundred or thousand (who’s counting?) and compiled a list of pet owner life hacks sure to have you patting yourself on the back.

Keep It Clean

Wrap duct tape around a paint roller to clean up pet hair, creating a giant “hair roller” if you will. It’s faster than vacuuming and really works (The Family Handyman website).

No duct tape on hand, but need an immediate fix? Run a rubber-gloved hand across upholstery, and it will remove pet hair (realsimple.com).

Remove pet hair from carpets by running a squeegee over them (BuzzFeed).

Use a squeeze ketchup bottle top as a vacuum attachment to suck up cat litter or other bits that fall into crevices of your floor or baseboards (lilluna.com).

Put double-sided tape on any surface where you don’t want your cat to lie. Cats avoid sticky things (BuzzFeed).

To clean up unsightly (and smelly) pet carpet stains, pour a generous amount of white vinegar on the stain. Then cover with baking soda. Cover with a bowl so the baking soda does not get kicked around. Leave on for a day or two until completely dried. Then vacuum up the baking soda. The stain will be removed naturally without harsh cleaners (onegoodthingbyjillee).

Down the Hatch

If Fido won’t take his meds, make your own pill pockets, via muttnut.blogspot.com. Simply mix one tablespoon of milk, one tablespoon of crunchy peanut butter and two tablespoons of flour. Form into 12 pockets, then store in the fridge or freezer.

Could your dog use a tick tack? While that’s probably not a safe idea, opt for a sprinkle of parsley over your pooch’s food for fresher breath naturally (leopolds-crate.blogspot.ca).

If your pet is dehydrated or unable to keep foods down, add some low-sodium chicken broth to his drinking water (lifecheating.com).

Clean out an empty syrup bottle and fill with clean water for trips to the dog park or long walks. Simple attach by the handle to a carabiner and hook on your belt loop (fieldandstream.com).

Does Rover scarf his food down too quickly? There’s a hack for that. Place a ball in his food bowl. He will be forced to move the ball around to get to all the food, slowing him down (baggybulldogs blog).

Make your own organic chicken jerky for a gourmet treat. Cut organic chicken breasts or tenders into one-half centimeters in thickness. Then place cling wrap over it and beat with a tenderizing hammer until thin to your liking.

Next, cut into 3-centimeter strips (approximately). Place on a lightly greased baking sheet. Bake at 200 degrees for two hours or until brown and crispy. Now let Fido enjoy a non-toxic, healthy treat. These can be stored for up to two weeks in the fridge. (For the photo guided step-by-step recipe, visit http://imgur.com/a/IkUj7.)

For a homemade summertime snack, cut up apples in chicken broth and freeze in ice cube trays (dogfooddude.blogspot.com).

For the Home

Hang a shower caddy on the inside of a closet door to store all your pet items—

brush, meds, treats, leashes, etc. (BuzzFeed).

Hide a litter box under a side table by securing kitty-sized, cute fabric curtains via baileytann.com. Then tie back one side for your cat to enter (BuzzFeed).

Make a DIY cat scratch by gluing a square carpet sample to a square wooden frame and hang low enough for your cat to reach. Voila, instant wall decor (squarecathabitat.com)!

If your feline friend loves to sit on, or in front of, your computer, place a shallow box lid, such as a board game box lid, upside down to the side of your computer. The natural cat instinct is to sit in the box. You’ll be more productive in no time (BuzzFeed).

‘Tis the Season to Hack

Looking for the perfect gift? Submit a photo of your pet to http://shelterpups.com, and they will create an adorable custom stuffed version of your pooch or anyone else’s—unique indeed.

Store your smaller ornaments in egg cartons. Your pet can’t destroy what he can’t reach if it’s safely tucked inside (toostinkincute.blogspot.com).

Hang wrapping paper on curtain rod hooks to safely keep them away from toddlers and pets who might enjoy unrolling and tearing them to pieces (the soulfulhouse.com).

FYI

While we hope you’ll never need this one, it is worth a try in a desperate situation. LifeHackable.com says one frantic owner ran into two hunters while searching for her dog. They told the owner they had successfully found dogs in the past by taking a worn article of clothing (the longer worn, the better to increase the human’s scent) and leaving it at the location the dog was last seen. If the dog has a familiar toy or two, take those items along also. Attach a note instructing passersby not to move the objects.

Also, leave a bowl of water as the pet may not have had access to water since being lost. Do not leave food that may attract other animals that the dog will avoid. The owner tried it and reported the dog waiting among the items the next day. While not 100-percent guaranteed to work, it’s worth a try to find a loved, lost pet.

In hot temps, cool your pooch down by freezing water, chicken broth, bones, toys, etc., in a cake mold and let him lick away until his heart’s content (Pinterest.com).

If your dog fights having his teeth brushed, squeeze enzymatic pet toothpaste on a Nylabone or rope toy and let him gnaw away on it, getting teeth clean in the process (BuzzFeed).

If you have a teething puppy that enjoys chewing on cords, spritz bitter apple spray onto a paper towel and wipe it along the cord. It will cover the surface area and not waste as much product as spraying directly onto the cord (BuzzFeed).

Run a dryer sheet along your dog’s fur during a thunder-storm. Chances are your pet is more distraught by the static electricity built up in his fur than the thunderstorm. According to marthastewart.com, this should work at least 50 percent of the time (BuzzFeed).

For easy tick removal, soak a cotton ball in liquid soap and swab the tick for a few seconds. The tick should come out on its own and be stuck to the cotton ball when you remove it (sdcount.ca.gov).

These are only a few of the life hacks available. Have some tried-and-true hacks that work? Let us know on our Facebook page at TulsaPets Magazine or tweet us @tulsapetsmag.

DVIS Mutt Strut 2015

posted September 28th, 2015 by
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Let Your ‘Mutt Strut’ For A Good Cause

By Anna Holton-Dean

 

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Domestic Violence Intervention Services (DVIS) in Tulsa is hosting its second annual Mutt Strut Saturday, Oct. 17 at Hunter Park. The dog walk, or “mutt strut,” is designed to raise awareness for the DVIS emergency shelter’s newly-opened kennel, which is the first of its kind in an Oklahoma domestic violence shelter.

Domestic Violence Intervention Services’ new kennel offers shelter to the most helpless of victims.

By bringing your pooch out to participate, you can help domestic violence victims and their pets transition to a better life. Admission to Mutt Strut is an in-kind donation to the kennel, such as gentle pet shampoos, blankets, pet beds, stainless steel water and food bowls, non-allergenic cat litter, bleach wipes and disposable gloves. The first 100 participants to arrive on Oct. 17 will receive dog treats from the Bridges Barkery made by employees of the Bridges Foundation.

Dress your dog in his or her finest costume for the pet contest. He or she may even be crowned king or queen. Have a matching costume for yourself? One winner will also win the title of “Best Owner/Dog Duo.”

DVIS began planning for the kennel last year and is pleased to have officially opened to clients and their pets this past July at its emergency shelter.

The kennel can house up to seven dogs at a time and features a 200-square-foot air-conditioned and heated interior and a 180- square-foot covered exterior space. A 1,773-square-foot outside dog run also gives them a place to run carefree and exercise. The separate cat facility can house up to four cats.

DVIS recognized the fact that many domestic violence victims are pet owners and their pets are a serious consideration when deciding to leave or stay in an abusive situation, Rachel Smith, DVIS community relations coordinator, says.

“Often an abusive partner will kill a pet left behind to get back at the victim for leaving,” she says. “As nearly all clients entering the DVIS emergency shelter have very little or no income, boarding their pets is not usually an option. According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, 71 percent of pet-owning women entering shelters reported that their batterer had injured, maimed, killed or threatened family pets    for revenge or to psychologically control victims. Now the new DVIS shelter offers a kennel for dogs and cats to take away the stress a client might feel if they don’t want to leave their pet behind.”

DVIS Executive Director Tracey Lyall says it’s not only a stress reducer but also a way to ensure “all members of the family are safe, including pets.”

“Often an abusive partner will target a    pet as revenge so we are grateful to offer this for women and men who are abused,” she says. With the kennel’s opening, she says the organization expects to see an influx of pet residents as the word spreads about this vital service.

The kennel recently hosted its first furry guest, Poppy*. During his stay, the DVIS kennel tech made sure Poppy was up-to-date on vaccinations and gave him a flea bath. He also wrote a letter of good behavior for Poppy’s owner to use when she was ready to move into her own apartment.

Another recent DVIS client brought her own dog food for use during her pet’s stay at the kennel, but was happy to receive a toy for her pooch. Most clients aren’t able to come prepared with pet food or paraphernalia so receiving simple items such as blankets, pet beds, treats and toys is a huge relief and source of joy and comfort in an otherwise negative situation.

“It’s important to DVIS to keep families and pets safe and give their owners peace of mind,” Lyall says. “It’s one less thing for a victim to worry about as they prepare to leave their abuser, and that’s key.”

Any resource, such as DVIS’ new kennel, that gives victims the strength and confidence to leave abusive relationships is a worthy cause and something other pet owners can feel good about supporting.

Visit dvis.org to register. For more information, contact Rachel Smith at (918) 508-2711 or [email protected].

 

 

*Name changed to protect privacy.

 

 

Date: Saturday, Oct. 17, 2015

Time: 9 a.m.

Location: Hunter Park

Admission: An in-kind donation: pet shampoo, blankets/pet beds, stainless steel water and food bowls, non-allergenic cat litter, bleach wipes and disposable gloves.

 

Dress your dog in his/her finest costume. Two lucky pooches will be crowned king and queen of the Mutt Strut. One winner will also win the title of “Best Owner/Dog Duo.” Visit dvis.org to register. For more information, contact Rachel Smith at (918) 508-2711 or [email protected]

PupPod

posted September 28th, 2015 by
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New US pet toy ‘PupPod’ promises to keep pups active and engaged while owners are away.

PupPod allows:

  • Pet parents to watch live video of their pups and interact remotely with them as their dogs play
  • Offers a new way to reduce boredom, destructive behaviour and separation anxiety
  • Allows dogs to learn new skills while owners are at work

 Pup Pod

No more lonely, bored dogs.

 

PupPod is a new interactive pet toy that helps reduce boredom, anxiety and destructive behavior in your dog, helping them learn new skills when you’re at away. Pet parents can tune in and interact with their dog while they’re playing with PupPod as well as share and compare progress with friends via a mobile app.

Seattle based Erick Eidus, CEO and founder of PupPod said: “The response to PupPod has been amazing. After dogs have tested it and I go to pack it up, dogs tend to look at me like ‘hey, don’t take my toy away.’ You can tell they are totally engaged and want to keep playing and learning.”

“The feedback we’ve received from the Kickstarter campaign to date has been amazing. We’ve heard from dog experts as well as pet parents who all think that what we are doing is a real break-through in stimulating dogs mentally. Dogs can play PupPod on their own and the game evolves so that the dog is always challenged. In a recent interview with the Discovery Channel, their science reporter said that in four years of covering technology, he’d never seen anything like PupPod and he was super excited about the product.”

“PupPod is actually a very ambitious project. There’s the toy and treat dispenser for the dog. There’s the video camera in the hub for streaming video to a pet parents phone. There’s the PupCloud service and algorthms to analyze all the data from game play so the dog is always challenged and pet parents can start to understand what their dog is thinking and how their dog compares to other dogs of the same breed or age. And we have big plans – a roadmap for a series of toys that all connect to PupPod.”

“PupPod is really a platform to connect dogs and pet parents in a way that hasn’t been available before.”

See it at http://puppod.com/

Embracing Change in Broken Arrow

posted September 26th, 2015 by
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Broken Arrow Animal Shelter Evolves

By Bria Bolton Moore / Photos by Foshay Photography

 

Jacko, a male Labrador/Mastiff mix puppy, is crouched in a pouncing position, eyes fixated on the camera, or maybe on who is behind the camera? It’s Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014, and Jacko is just one of the 33 animals currently available for adoption at the Broken Arrow Animal Shelter.

Throughout the past year, the Broken Arrow Animal Shelter, located at 4121 E. Omaha St., has made a change to ensure that animals like Jacko are not only provided with food, medical attention and shelter, but also a permanent home.

“I was raised in the country. I’m a cowboy at heart and grew up with animals. So, I’ve always cared about animals and their well-being,” says Animal Control Director Larry Dampf. He has been with the shelter since 2003 and served as the director for eight years, seeing the shelter through its recent changes.

Dampf says a lot of the developments came after the shelter moved from a 5,500 square-foot building to its current 13,500 square-foot shelter in August of 2011. With new space, came new opportunity.

New Policies and Procedures

Up until about a year and a half ago, those who adopted a pet from the Broken Arrow Animal Shelter signed a Sterilization Agreement, essentially promising that they would get their new pet spayed or neutered. New pet owners would pay a deposit, get their animals sterilized, and  then the City would refund the deposit back to them. Now, however, pets are spayed or neutered before they’re handed over to their new owners.

“There are a lot of factors that go into the spay and neuter program,” says Dampf, who had been envisioning a different process for more than a decade. “You have to have the vet; you have to have the funding; you have to have the facility. But it’s always been on the radar that we wanted to implement and have every animal spayed or neutered.”

According to the Humane Society of the United States, there are about six to  eight million homeless animals entering animal shelters every year in the United States. Unfortunately, barely half of them  are adopted.

“Spay/neuter is the only permanent, 100-percent effective method of birth  control for dogs and cats,” according to the Humane Society.

“The last thing we want to do is contribute back to shelter over-crowding,” Dampf says. “Through the spay and neuter program, we’re helping to decrease those numbers     in shelters.”

In an effort to better serve its patrons, the Broken Arrow Animal Shelter changed its business hours from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Saturday, to 11:30 a.m. to 5:45 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., on Saturday.

“We found that the public really couldn’t get off work and be here at 4 o’clock,” Dampf says. ”Now, it’s easier for them to be able to get here and do business with the Broken Arrow Animal Shelter, which is a real plus.”

Dampf said the shelter has also hired an on-staff veterinarian consultant who comes in on a weekly basis to oversee the health of the animals. Additionally, the shelter  spent $12,000 on new software to track animals under its care, record adoptions   and much more.

The shelter also made a change to how it euthanizes animals. Nationwide, more than 2.7 million healthy, adoptable cats and dogs are euthanized annually in shelters, according to the Humane Society.

About a year ago, the Broken Arrow Animal Shelter got rid of its gas chamber, which was used for euthanasia. The shelter now only uses injection to put animals down.

Interested in Adopting?

Unfortunately, there’s never a shortage of furry friends waiting for their turn to go “home.” Here’s how pet adoption works at the Broken Arrow Animal Shelter:

  1. Visit the shelter, and fill out a questionnaire about the type of pet you’re seeking.
  2. Browse the dogs and cats available for adoption. Spend some time with your potential pet in a “get acquainted room.” While animals surrendered to the shelter are available for adoption immediately, stray animals are kept for five days before they are available for adoption.
  3. When you find the pet that’s right for you, fill out the paperwork and pay the $60 adoption fee, which includes spay or neuter, rabies shot and the five-in-one (includes Parvo, Distemper, Bordatella, etc.).
  4. Pick up your pet the following day after its spay or neuter procedure.

Photos of animals available for adoption can be viewed online at baanimalshelter.com and now also on www.tulsapetsmagazine.com.

All of the shelter’s recent changes point to one thing: the shelter’s desire to serve the people and animals of Broken Arrow.

“Every shelter worker is burdened with saving animals,” Dampf says. “It becomes  the responsibility of the shelter staff to take care of the animal, house him, feed him and then expend every opportunity and every avenue to find another home for that animal.”

Dampf says the shelter will continue to evolve to best serve the Broken Arrow community and find permanent homes for animals like Jacko.

“We must provide the kind of service and care for animals that is needed,” he says, “that is through continued education and making sure that all our processes and business model are up to date.”

Moore groomer wins Creative Groomer of the Year

posted September 25th, 2015 by
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Lori Craig of Moore was recently named Barkleigh Honors Creative Groomer of the Year, a national title voted on by her dog grooming peers as part of Groom Expo in Hershey, Pa.

I have been nominated the last four years for it, but I won it this year, so it was really pretty amazing,” Craig said.

So what is creative grooming exactly?

As Craig explains, there is breed profile grooming, where you take a dog and you cut it to it’s breed profile. This is probably what most people know as dog grooming.

“And then there is creative grooming where you transfer the dog’s coat and fur into something completely different,” Craig said. “As a dog groomer, we get really bored. We do the same haircut day in and day out on every dog. With creative grooming, you add color, you add some hairspray and you start sculpting the hair.”

10639590_10152495270454473_413792196524344893_nA quick Google image search on my part brought up dogs with hair of every color, mohawks and fantastical shapes sculpted in to the fur of mostly standard poodles, some other dog breeds and even a few cats!

Craig’s winning designs this year were her Phantom of the Opera creation and Monarch butterflies.

“It’s amazing what you can do with fur,” Craig said.

For anyone concerned about the welfare of the animals involved, there is no need. The products and dyes used in the process are labeled for pets. Not to mention, the dogs love being transformed, says Craig.

“The dogs love the color and love the attention,” Craig said. “Dogs thrive on positive reinforcement and when people see a colored-up dog, they run and flock to them. [The dogs] absolutely love it!”

1017412_10201113386868871_72297664_nCraig says she has been doing creative grooming for about 12 years. She has been featured on TLC’s ‘Extreme Poodles’ and has traveled the world including Singapore, Scotland, Ireland and London teaching others how to turn their dogs into living artwork. She also takes her dogs on the road with her to compete across the nation.

Craig’s grooming salon Doggie Styles is located at 1261 S Eastern Ave., Moore, and she says creative grooming is gaining popularity.

“I probably do three to five creative things a day,” Craig said. “I do mohawks with color, stick on earrings, It’s just a way to make somebody’s dog stick out from the others.”

To make an appointment for your dog, call 405-790-0926 or visit www.doggiestylesok.com to view more of her incredible creations.

– Lauren Cavagnolo, [email protected]