General Interest

Puppy Treads

posted September 4th, 2015 by
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Puppy Treads

WHY do I need Puppy Treads?

Protect your pet from falls that could cause injuries

Treads will also keep children and other family members safe on slippery hardwood stairs

Minimize scratch damage to your hardwood floors and stairs

 

WHAT are Puppy Treads?

Lightweight, attractive, cost-effective, install in minutes

Provide a safe, non-slip walking surface for your pet

Gentle on feet

Manufactured and distributed by the HandiRamp Company, which has been making accessibility and safety products in the U.S. for over 50 years

 

WHERE can Puppy-Treads be used?

Interior hardwood stairs and floors

Tile flooring

TulsaPets Magazine installation

TulsaPets Magazine installation

To find out more about Puppy Treads go to:

https://www.handiramp.com/puppytreads

Use the discount code BLOG2015

Catsy, an app for your cat!

posted August 27th, 2015 by
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Catsy

Louisville, Colo., USA (27 August 2015) — Spastic Muffin, LLC is happy to announce the launch of Catsy, a new cat toy mobile app on the Apple App Store. This cat toy app allows customization and sharing with others: New games can be created and sent to others via email. We made this app because one of our cats really liked another Apple game app, but that app seemed too complicated, kept asking you (or your cat!) to make purchases, and didn’t let you customize or share. Catsy is simple to use, and it is free.

Catsy animates an “Ugly Duckling” on the screen of an iPhone, iPad, or iPod Touch (YouTube videos linked at http://GetCatsy.com). Your cat paws at the screen and when they hit the Ugly Duckling, the app makes a bird or cat sound. Humans use authoring mode to create new games, and share games with others via email. Catsy makes it easy to keep the screen locked with Apple Guided Access (see help in authoring mode), so your kitty can play without Tweeting or posting to Facebook!

Catsy can be downloaded from the Apple App store using this link:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/catsy/id1008360836?mt=8&uo=4&ls=1

Did My Dog Just Cough?

posted August 2nd, 2015 by
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Cough2

By NANCY GALLIMORE WERHANE, CPDT-KA

I just survived my first, and hopefully only, major cold of this winter season. It was a beauty. Cough, congestion, stuffy nose, laryngitis-the works. I did receive a good deal of sympathy for it, but nobody panicked. Nobody rushed me to the hospital. Now, give any one of those symptoms to a dog and stand back. Let a sweet-faced canine issue one wheeze and panic ensues. I am not making light of this phenomenon as I am as guilty as the rest of the dog moms and dads in this world.

So what is it that makes it so much worse when a dog comes down with a bug? Well, I think the first issue is that our dogs have a really hard time describing their symptoms and telling us where it hurts. That makes us all feel just a bit helpless because, well, our dogs depend on us to make everything ok. Then there’s the fear that if you ignore something now, it may well later-say midnight on any major holiday-turn into something that inspires a costly-though-we-wouldnever put-a-price-on-love trip to the emergency vet. And finally there are those darn puppy eyes. There is nothing more pitiful than seeing your normally bouncy, happy friend feeling anything less than bouncy and happy.

One of the most common ailments to strike our canine counterparts is often referred to as kennel cough. That name likely came about many years ago before our dogs had active social lives. Back when I was a kid, there were no dog parks or dog daycares (or cell phones or laptop computers, but that’s an entirely different story). If you did attend a group training class, it might be in the open air of the Fairgrounds parking lot and the dogs were not allowed to mingle.

Truth be told, the family dog rarely left home and if it did, it was probably for a trip to the vet, the groomer, or a stay at a boarding kennel. Since a boarding kennel was one of the few places where dogs came together, it was one of the primary places where dogs were exposed to germs. This is where most believe the name “kennel cough” was born.

Kennel cough, or today’s more “p.c.” term, canine cough, is most often characterized by a deep throated cough, which many dog owners describe as sounding as though the dog has something stuck in its throat. In print it looks something like this: Cough, cough, cough-hack. And the hack can include the expulsion of a foamy mucous. Words can paint such a pretty picture! The far harder to spell term your veterinarian will use is canine tracheitis or infectious tracheobronchitis. According to Dr. Lauren Johnson, of Southern Hills Veterinary Hospital in Tulsa, canine cough is a general term used to characterize a highly contagious cough that can be caused by one or several etiologic agents and can either be bacterial or viral.

Simply put, there isn’t just one cause for canine cough. Kennel cough, canine cough, infectious tracheobronchitis-whatever you decide to call it, the name is really an umbrella term used to cover a number of possible infectious agents.

Because today’s active canine has quite the social life compared to their ancestors from decades past -yes, even those distant 90s-exposure to other dogs and therefore challenges to the immune system happen on a far more regular basis. Dogs have play dates. They go to training schools, they visit dog daycare for group play and they go to the dog park. They play, they romp and they swap spit. There’s no way around it.

Just like kids going to school, germs go right along with them. Ask any teacher as a new semester of classes start up each fall and they’ll tell you they just brace for the new round of runny noses and sneezes to come. It’s basically inevitable. The price of socialization- which trainers and veterinarians will tell you is invaluable to the long term well-being of your dog-is possible exposure to disease. Of course this is why we vaccinate. We protect our dogs from contracting a lot of scary stuff. Parvovirus, distemper, rabies and other potentially devastating diseases are easily prevented with a proper series of vaccinations.

So for our social dogs there is the Bordetella vaccine, the one that stops canine cough. Problem solved, right? Well, yes and no. Go ahead, heave a collective sigh. The term Bordetella is derived from the name of a bacterium, Bordetella bronchiseptica, a chief causative agent in most cases of canine cough. “If you give your dog the Bordetella vaccine, either through nasal drops or injection, it will be protected from the particular strains in the vaccine itself, but not necessarily from all contagious coughs in general,” explains Dr. Johnson. “There are several things we don’t vaccinate for routinely that can cause the same contagious cough symptoms.”

“In addition, there are several variations of the Bordetella strains. Vaccines cannot include every strain. They can only contain the most common strains. Think about it like our flu vaccine. Some people receive this vaccine and still get sick.” So here’s how it goes, the infected dog sheds infectious bacteria and/or viruses in respiratory secretions. These secretions are then transmitted through the air via a cough or sneeze, or they are transmitted directly to another dog through nose-to-nose or mouthto mouth contact.

The tricky part for pet care professionals and owners alike is that a dog can have canine cough, but not yet be coughing or can even remain asymptomatic all together. That means a dog can come to the dog park, for example, play and act completely normal, but another dog may catch a bug from that dog and actually develop full symptoms.
So yes, your dog can be fully vaccinated and healthy as a horse, but still contract canine cough. Is this cause for panic? Should Fido live in a bubble? Well, of course not.

Take logical precautions. Do get the Bordetella vaccine. Even if it doesn’t totally protect your dog, it can help boost your dog’s immunity and hopefully lessen symptoms and duration of the infection if your dog does become ill.

If you plan to board your dog or take it to daycare, check the place out. You want to see plenty of space where there is good air circulation. You want to see that it is clean and you should feel free to ask about cleaning and disinfecting protocols.

Still, with all the precautions in the world, a dog can still catch canine cough at any facility where it comes in close proximity with other dogs. This includes a visit to your veterinarian, a walk through the animal supply store and a spa day at the groomer. It is not just limited to kennels.

So what do you do if your dog does give a little cough? According to Dr. Johnson, you should first isolate the affected dog from other dogs. That means no walks, no trips to the groomer, no training class, no daycare or dog park play. A mild case of canine cough will often go away on its own within seven to 10 days.

Does your dog need to see the veterinarian? It is never wrong to play it safe by seeking a professional opinion. You may first want to see if your dog is running a temperature. This can be easily accomplished through the use of a rectal thermometer and a little petroleum jelly. Yes, you really can do this. A normal temperature for a dog should range between 100.5 to 102.5 degrees.

If your pet’s coughing is excessive, accompanied by a fever, loss of appetite or any nasal discharge, you should call your veterinarian right away to have your dog assessed and to determine the proper course of treatment.
Antibiotics are not always necessary in the treatment of canine cough, just as they are not generally used in treating a mild cold in humans. “If the patient is a healthy dog with a mild cough, it is possible to forgo antibiotics and just treat with supportive care such as cough suppressants or possibly a steroid to reduce inflammation,” advises Dr. Johnson.
“However, if the patient is extremely young with a naive immune system, elderly, sickly or at risk of the infection progressing into pneumonia, then antibiotics may be necessary.”

“Mild cases of classic kennel cough are most often self-limiting. However, owners are often frustrated by the coughing, which can escalate at night and frequently disrupts everyone’s sleep, so at a very minimum we try to relieve symptoms.” Dr. Johnson further counsels that ideally, the affected dog should stay quarantined at home for up to 10 days beyond that last cough to prevent spreading the infection to other dogs. The good news is that in healthy dogs with uncompromised immune systems, it appears that regular socialization helps to build natural immunity to many of the common strains of canine cough. Yes, interaction with other dogs is still a good thing.

At the end of the day, if your dog develops a little cough, but is otherwise healthy and normal, it should come through the ordeal just fine. Perhaps we, the doting humans involved, should take two aspirin and then call the veterinarian in the morning.

Nancy Gallimore Werhane is a certified professional dog trainer, co-owner of Pooches dog care facility, Dalmatian fancier and rescue group coordinator.

Bark in the Park tonight! June 17th 7:05pm

posted June 17th, 2015 by
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McElroy Monday

20150617B

Join the Drillers for the first installment of City Vet Hospital Bark and Park, presented by Tulsa SPCA and City of Tulsa, Save our Streams this Wednesday, June 17th at 7:05p. Gates open at 6p and fans with dogs should present their shot records at the Oil Derrick or Arvest Entrance to gain entry with their furry friends. All dogs must be on a leash and fans with dogs will need to purchase lawn or terrace tickets for that evening’s game! The Drillers will have relief and watering stations on site!

Tickets are available at TulsaDrillers.com

“I knew I didn’t want to be a large-animal veterinarian, and I didn’t want to live in North Dakota”

posted April 25th, 2015 by
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Ross Clark

Practice management guru Dr. Ross Clark reveals his thoughts about the past and future of veterinary medicine.

 

Apr 21, 2015

 

Training 911 – Socialization Nation

posted April 19th, 2015 by
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20140915c

Training 911

Training 911

Socialization Nation

 

By Mary Green

 

Socialization is a big buzzword in dog training and pet owner circles. Dog parks, play groups, day cares and training classes all stress the importance of socializing your pet. Here’s a common scenario: a pet owner calls me and says, “I think my dog needs socialization.”  “OK”, I answer. “What’s going on with her?” “I took her to the vet today, and she was afraid of everyone and everything,” she says. “So my vet said she is under-socialized.”

 

What Is Socialization, and How Do You Go About “Socializing” Your Dog?

Socialization is the process of introducing a puppy to people, places, objects, animals and sounds. When a puppy is exposed to these new things in a positive manner, she is more likely to accept new things as an adult.

According to the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior, the primary and most important time for puppy socialization is the first three months of life. During this time, sociability outweighs fear. Great! However, when you bring your puppy home at 8 weeks, she is already two-thirds of the way through the socialization period. It’s not too late! Your puppies aren’t destined to be social outcasts or misfits if you take smart steps toward socialization.

Have puppy parties

Invite people to come over! Rule of thumb: for every woman the puppy meets, she needs to meet one adult male and one child. Invite kids of all ages but not all at the same time. Ask people to wear funny hats, coats and uniforms.

Go to puppy kindergarten

Dr. Ian Dunbar (at dogstardaily.com) has some tips for finding a good puppy class. Enroll in a puppy class that has a good sanitization program and requires proof of vaccination and work closely with your veterinarian to keep your puppy current on her vaccinations.

Visit pet-friendly businesses

Don’t limit your field trips to the pet supply store. Find a café with a dog-friendly patio. Ask businesses that you frequent (your bank, hardware store, liquor store, book-store, etc.) if you can bring your puppy in for

a visit and make

it brief!

Make happy visits to the veterinarian or groomer

Just run in, meet some people, see some other animals and get up on

the scale or grooming table! Every visit to the veterinarian shouldn’t be just for a procedure or vaccination. Many vet clinics have resident birds and cats to visit, as well as pet-friendly staff.

Car rides

Make the most of a car ride by going to a drive-through fast food restaurant. Or go to the automatic car wash, but be aware that it can be pretty scary. Go to the drive up window at the bank and see if the teller has dog cookies, which many often do!

At home

Introduce your pup to the scary things that reside in your home, such as the vacuum cleaner. I had a puppy that thought the vacuum was a fire-breathing dragon that lived in the closet/cave and sprung ferociously to life. Items you use daily, such as a hair dryer, coffee bean grinder, and appliances, provide opportunities for your puppy to socialize with objects. Get creative and pull out your motion-activated holiday decorations.

The goal is to let your puppy socialize at her own pace. Don’t overwhelm her with  too many things at one time. Give her the time and space to be comfortable in approaching new people, animals or objects, and reward her with treats and praise for each encounter.