Pet Health

Oklahoma State Free Service Animal Eye Exams

posted March 31st, 2018 by
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Oklahoma State

OSU

ACVO

Oklahoma State University Veterinary Medical Hospital to Provide Free Eye Exams to Oklahoma Service & Working Animals through the ACVO® and StokesRx Annual Event in May

Registration for the 2018 National Service Animal Eye Exam event in U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico opens April 1  

Stillwater, Oklahoma (March 29, 2018)Oklahoma State University’s Veterinary Medical Hospital to provide free eye exams to Service and Working Animals in Stillwater during the month of May as part of The American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists (ACVO®)’s 11th annual ACVO/StokesRx National Service Animal Eye Exam event. Board certified veterinary ophthalmologists across the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico will collectively provide more than 7,500 free eye exams as part of the annual program in 2018.

The American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists is an approved veterinary specialty organization of the American Board of Veterinary Specialties that board certifies veterinarians as ophthalmologists. The organization developed the ACVO/StokesRx National Service Animal Eye Exam event in 2008, and since its inception, nearly 60,000 Service and Working Animals have received free screening eye exams — including approximately 7,500 in 2017 during the 10th Anniversary event.

Honor, a three-year-old yellow lab Service Dog trained by Freedom Dogs in San Diego, received her first free eye exam during the ACVO/StokesRx National Service Animal Eye Exam event in the 2017 10th Anniversary event (picture can be found here). Like many Service Dogs, Honor works loyally each day to help her handler, Marine, Cpl. TJ Melhus, with tasks such as, medication retrieval, retrieval of dropped items, blocking people from approaching, alerting of people approaching from behind, and redirecting anxiety attacks through pressure from her chin.

“It was so important for Honor to take part in the ACVO/StokesRx National Service Animal Eye Exam event for the first time in 2017,” said Katie Stoll, Honor’s trainer/puppy raiser at Freedom Dogs. “The free eye exams provide Service Animal handlers with the comfort of knowing their animals are healthy — sight is an asset these dogs use each day to keep their handlers safe.”

Around 300 board certified veterinary ophthalmologists throughout the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico will donate their time and resources to provide free screening exams to Service and Working Animals in May. In addition to dogs, other Service or Working Animals including horses, miniature horses, donkeys, alpacas and cats can receive free sight-saving exams.

The goal of the ACVO/StokesRx National Service Animal Eye Exam event is to provide as many free screening exams as possible to eligible Service and Working Animals. The following types of Working or Service Animals may qualify: guide, handicapped assistance, detection, military, search and rescue, and current, registered therapy animals – all whom selflessly serve the public.

This year’s event is sponsored by ACVO® and Stokes Pharmacy, as well as several generous industry sponsors.  Oklahoma State University’s Veterinary Medical Hospital and participating board certified ophthalmologists volunteer their services, staff and facilities at no charge for Service and Working Animals and their owners/agents to participate in the event.

HOW TO REGISTER FOR THE 2018 EVENT:

 

To qualify, Service and Working Animals must be “active working animals” that have been trained through a formal training program or organization, or are currently enrolled in a formal training program. The training organization could be national, regional or local in nature. More qualification details are available here. Owners/agents for the animal(s) must FIRST register the animal via an online registration form beginning April 1 at www.ACVOeyeexam.org. Registration ends April 30. Once registered online, the owner/agent will receive a registration number and will be allowed access to a list of participating ophthalmologists. Then, they may contact a specialist to schedule an appointment, which will take place during the month of May.  Oklahoma State University’s Veterinary Medical Hospital requires that participants meet all event qualifications and provide the assigned registration number over the phone. Times may vary depending on the facility and are filled on a first-come, first-served basis, so owners/agents are encouraged to register and make appointments early.

About the American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists®

The American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists® (ACVO®) is an approved veterinary specialty organization of the American Board of Veterinary Specialties, and is recognized by the American Veterinary Medical Association. Its mission is “to advance the quality of veterinary medicine through certification of veterinarians who demonstrate excellence as specialists in veterinary ophthalmology.” To become board certified, a candidate must successfully complete a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine degree, a one-year internship, a three-year ACVO® approved residency and pass a series of credentials and examinations. For more information, please visit www.ACVO.org.

About Stokes Pharmacy

Stokes Pharmacy is a national, full-service compounding pharmacy specializing in the art and science of the custom formulation of prescription medicines for humans and animals. Leading the way in innovation, Stokes invites veterinarians to prescribe compounded medications online securely, quickly, and accurately via iFill, a cloud-based prescription management system. For more information, visit stokesrx.com.

About Oklahoma State University’s Veterinary Medical Hospital

Oklahoma State University’s Veterinary Medical Hospital is part of OSU’s Center for Veterinary Health Sciences, one of only 30 veterinary colleges in the United States. The Hospital is open to the public and provides routine wellness and specialized care for small and large animals. Certified by the American Animal Hospital Association, the Hospital offers 24-hour emergency care. For more information, visit www.cvhs.okstate.edu or call (405) 744-7000.

Dr. Carlos Risco is new OSU Veterinary Dean

posted October 20th, 2017 by
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Carlos Risco

Oklahoma State names Dr. Carlos Risco Center for Veterinary Health Sciences dean

 

(STILLWATER, Okla., October 20, 2017) – The Oklahoma State University/A&M Board of Regents today approved the appointment of Dr. Carlos A. Risco as dean of the Oklahoma State University Center for Veterinary Health Sciences. He is expected to assume his position in March.

Carlos RiscoRisco is currently at the University of Florida where he serves as a tenured professor and chair of the Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences.

“I am excited for the opportunity to serve as dean,” Risco said. “The strong culture of scholarship, outstanding curriculum and the multidisciplinary approach to improve both animal and human health has led to the excellent reputation of the OSU Center for Veterinary Health Sciences.

“This reputation makes Oklahoma State a place where students want to attend,” Risco said. “As dean, I look forward to working with our talented faculty and staff to continue progress in the center’s role as a regional, national and international leader in veterinary medical education, research, and service.”

OSU Provost and Senior Vice President Gary Sandefur said, “We are pleased to have Dr. Risco join the OSU team. He will provide strong vision and leadership for our excellent veterinary program. I want to thank Vice President Thomas Coon and members of the search and screening committee for leading our national search and identifying an outstanding pool of candidates. I also appreciate Chris Ross and his solid leadership as interim dean.”

Risco received his DVM degree in 1980 from the University of Florida and advanced clinical training as an intern in private dairy practice at the Chino Valley Veterinary Associates in California. He is a diplomate in the American College of Theriogenologists.

From 1982 to 1990, he was a full partner at Chino Valley Veterinary Associates, a nine-veterinarian dairy practice. In 1990, he joined the faculty at the University of Florida as an assistant professor in the College of Veterinary Medicine.

Dr. Risco’s main research focus pertains to metabolic disorders and reproductive management of dairy cows.

 

CONTACT: Gary Shutt | OSU Communications | 405-744-4800 | [email protected]

Oklahoma State University is a modern land-grant university that prepares students for success. OSU has more than 36,000 students across its five-campus system and more than 25,000 on its combined Stillwater and Tulsa campuses, with students from all 50 states and around 120 nations. Established in 1890, Oklahoma State has graduated more than 260,000 students who have been serving Oklahoma and the world for 125 years. 

 

Derinda D. Blakeney, APR

Public Relations and Marketing Coordinator

Oklahoma State University

Center for Veterinary Health Sciences

308 McElroy Hall

Stillwater, OK 74078

(405) 744-6740 (office)

(405) 744-5233 (fax)

(405) 612-4019 (mobile)

[email protected]

 

Pet-Safe Garage

posted July 31st, 2016 by
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Pet-Safe

Pet-Safe Garage

Pet parents are responsible for the safety of their furry friends. Many invest in high-tech or “green” pet food, toys and cleaners. Pets are considered part of the family and as such, are typically allowed to go practically anywhere in the home. But there is one place that might pose a threat to pets; the garage. The garage is a repository for all sorts of items, sharp tools, cars that might leak dangerous chemicals, or fertilizers. These items may not seem as dangerous to humans, but they can be deadly to pets. Updating a few things in the garage can transform the space into one that is safe for pets!  

 

Update Lighting:

The typical garage light is dim and poorly illuminates more than a few feet, leaving a good portion of the garage in shadow. Lighting is important when it comes to pulling the family vehicle in and out of the garage. Pets can easily vanish in the shadows and end up in the path of the car. To eliminate those shadowy spaces, switch garage lighting for updated bulbs or add additional lights.

 

Temperature Control:

Pet-SafeMost garages do not have proper insulation so they can get extremely cold in the winter or hot in the summer. Extreme temperatures and beloved pets do not mix. If pets are left in the garage for prolonged periods of time, it’s important to maintain an even and comfortable temperature. The garage door is the most vulnerable to fluctuating temperatures. Add insulated panels to your garage door or invest in a completely new door. It’s also a good idea to add weatherstripping to the garage door to seal the garage against extreme temperatures in winter and summer.

 

Secure Storage Options:

When you walk into your garage do you see garden tools propped up against the walls or stacks of boxes in the corner? Perhaps there is sports’ equipment strewn across the floor? These unreliable storage solutions could harm your furry best friend. They could easily knock items over onto themselves, which could lead to serious harm. Sharp items like shovels and saws should also be stored out of reach of pets. Instead of storing your items haphazardly in the garage, utilize the walls and ceiling. Invest in sturdy shelves or cabinets that easily get your items out of reach of your pets.

 

Separate Storage:Pet-Safe

Because garages are a  catch-all for countless items,these items sometimes get jumbled together. If homeowners are not careful, harmful chemicals could be stored right next to pet food or toys. It’s important to set aside a special and specific place for pet supplies. Store cleaning supplies, fertilizers, or other hazardous items safely behind lockable cabinet doors or up on shelves. Even if cleaning supplies are stored in plastic containers, it is better to store Fido’s gear elsewhere.

 

Be Aware:

This tip is closely related to the lighting tip, but takes it one step further. During the colder months, smaller pets – like cats seek warmth from a variety of places. Felines have been known to seek warmth in the wheelwell or under the hood of vehicles. Before you move any vehicles, it’s always a good idea to take a peek around to ensure no pets are napping nearby.

 

Pet Dishes and Food:

Pet-SafeIf you keep your pet’s food or water dishes in the garage, it’s wise to routinely check that no chemicals or pests have found their way into the dishes. Pet food should always be stored securely, but especially if it is being stored in the garage. Your furry friend’s food can attract some unwanted guests if left open. Don’t go straight for plastic containers for your pet food as they can contaminate it. The best solution for pet food storage is keeping the food in the original bag, inside a sealable container to avoid attracting pests and maintaining the healthiness of the food.

 

Oil, Gas or Chemical Spills:

Most vehicles will leak at some point in their lifespan, leaving pools of oil or coolant behind in the garage. These little spills can be deadly to curious pets. Taking your car in for routine checkups is important if Fido will be poking around in the garage.

 

Taking a few minutes to ensure a pet’s safety is never wasted time. The garage is easily forgotten when it comes to pet safety. Updating lighting, properly storing items and maintaining the separation of pet supplies and other items keeps your pet safe and healthy in the garage. Ensure your pet’s safety and enjoy spending time with your friend while you work on various projects in the garage!

 

For more help getting your garage organized visit http://garagesolutionskansascity.com/

 

BIO:

 

Bri works for Monkey Bars of Kansas City a garage storage and organization company that helps homeowners create custom garage storage solutions. Bri graduated from BYU-Idaho in Advertising and Public Relations. When she’s not working, she enjoys all things film, good books and making memories with her husband and German Shepherd.

 

What’s in Your Dog Shampoo?

posted July 7th, 2016 by
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What's in Your Dog Shampoo

What’s in Your Dog Shampoo? – Words of Wellness

By Emily Cefalo

 

Choosing a shampoo is an important part of your dog’s skin and coat health.

 

Well-known shampoos, such as Hartz Love Your Dog Shampoo, Miracle Coat Premium, Lambert Kay, Sergeant’s Fur-So-Fresh, Natural Research, and Pure Pet’s Pure Care, are among those without the ingredients listed on the label. So what kind of shampoo does your groomer use?

Before I became self-employed, I was amazed at how many groomers use Dawn soap on dogs. The risk of soap burning the skin and eyes is profoundly common. Shampoos containing sulfates, soap and parabens can cause a variety of skin disorders, not to mention they can be toxic and harmful. Even using human shampoo can cause reactions.

We want our pets clean, but we do not want their skin stripped of natural oils. There are many pet shampoos to choose from—just make certain you buy one that is gentle on your beloved pet.

Look for “soap and paraben free” and “pH balanced” when you’re shopping for a safe shampoo. Earthbath Mediterranean Magic is one of our favorites and is used on almost every dog. Another favorite used is Show Season Essential shampoo. We like the way it smells; it has aromatherapy and is infused with organic rosemary, olive and sunflower oil.

You always have the option to take your shampoo with you to your pet’s grooming appointments. If you aren’t sure what is used on your beloved pet, ask to take a peek behind the curtain to ensure your pet is getting the very best!

 

Wags & Kisses

Mia & Co. Pet Salon

It’s Hot

posted July 5th, 2016 by
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Looking Back

It’s Hot – – It’s going to get Hotter

No matter how many ways we say it –

Don’t leave your pets in your car, truck, pick up, SUV, Jeep
– anything that has four wheels, a motor, and windows.

Dogs do not sweat. Let me repeat – – dogs do not sweat. They pant, vigorously, to say cool. When it is hot in a closed up car, their body temperature climbs quickly. Your quick stop at the convenience store, grocery store – – whatever – – will mean tragedy for your pets.

More and more states are passing legislation that makes it legal for a citizen to break a window to rescue an animal in distress. No Oklahoma hasn’t passed it yet. It’s a band wagon we should be on – – but we’re not.

The Fourth of July has come and gone. Rescues and municipal shelters have been inundated with lost, frightened, scared pets. Add to that the pets that will be left in locked cars – – – it is overwhelming for all of us who work in rescue.

Look at the picture – – look at your pet. Do the right thing when it comes to your mode of transportation and the animals who trust you.

Kay Stout, Director   PAAS Vinita  [email protected]  918-256-7227

It's Hot

Coconut Oil For Our Furry Friends

posted June 30th, 2016 by
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Coconut Oil

Coconut Oil For Our Furry Friends – Words of Wellness

By Emily Cefalo

 

Nowadays, everyone is focusing on wellness, and caring for our furry friends is no exception.  I get asked almost every day by pet owners how to get rid of pet odors. Whether it is goopy eyes or stinky ears and skin, my answer is always the same—coconut oil!

I’ve been in the dog grooming industry since 1997. We always use natural and botanical products at Mia & Company.  Sometimes that isn’t enough.

Fed regularly to pets, coconut oil can have many health benefits for their skin, digestive and immune systems, metabolic function, even their bone and brain health! Here are some of my top reasons for adding coconut oil to your dog’s diet:

Coconut oil improves overall skin health and clears up skin conditions such as eczema, flea allergies, contact dermatitis and itchy skin. It can reduce bad breath. Dog lovers even brush their pets’ teeth with it, as they love the taste.

Incredibly emollient, coconut oil helps moisturize the driest skin and makes a dog’s coat gleam with health—whether you add it to her diet, her shampoo or both!

Applied topically to the skin, coconut oil promotes the healing of cuts, wounds, hot spots, bites and stings.

The antibacterial and antifungal properties of coconut oil help reduce doggie odor, and the pleasant, tropical aroma imparts a delightful scent to a dog’s skin and coat.

Coconut oil prevents and treats yeast infections, including candida. The antiviral agents also help dogs recover quickly from kennel cough.

I would recommend starting your pet on a low dose. If you have a small dog or cat, less than 15 pounds, start out using a one-fourth teaspoon.  If you have a medium to large breed, start out using one-half teaspoon. Once applied to their dog food, it absorbs immediately. Any brand will work but make sure it’s unrefined.

 

Wags & Kisses

Mia & Co. Pet Salon

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