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Pet Life Hacks

posted October 3rd, 2015 by
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Pet Life Hacks

Making Life Easier

 

Who couldn’t use some shortcuts to make life easier? Simple, everyday tips right under your nose that you just haven’t thought of are also now at your fingertips if you know how to use a computer keyboard.

Enter the “life hack .” Thanks to websites like BuzzFeed, Pinterest and tens of thousands of blogs, you can read life hack lists for hours—mind blown. Oxforddictionaries.com defines a life hack as “a strategy or technique adopted in order to manage one’s time and daily activities in a more efficient way.”

We’ve sifted through a few hundred or thousand (who’s counting?) and compiled a list of pet owner life hacks sure to have you patting yourself on the back.

Keep It Clean

Wrap duct tape around a paint roller to clean up pet hair, creating a giant “hair roller” if you will. It’s faster than vacuuming and really works (The Family Handyman website).

No duct tape on hand, but need an immediate fix? Run a rubber-gloved hand across upholstery, and it will remove pet hair (realsimple.com).

Remove pet hair from carpets by running a squeegee over them (BuzzFeed).

Use a squeeze ketchup bottle top as a vacuum attachment to suck up cat litter or other bits that fall into crevices of your floor or baseboards (lilluna.com).

Put double-sided tape on any surface where you don’t want your cat to lie. Cats avoid sticky things (BuzzFeed).

To clean up unsightly (and smelly) pet carpet stains, pour a generous amount of white vinegar on the stain. Then cover with baking soda. Cover with a bowl so the baking soda does not get kicked around. Leave on for a day or two until completely dried. Then vacuum up the baking soda. The stain will be removed naturally without harsh cleaners (onegoodthingbyjillee).

Down the Hatch

If Fido won’t take his meds, make your own pill pockets, via muttnut.blogspot.com. Simply mix one tablespoon of milk, one tablespoon of crunchy peanut butter and two tablespoons of flour. Form into 12 pockets, then store in the fridge or freezer.

Could your dog use a tick tack? While that’s probably not a safe idea, opt for a sprinkle of parsley over your pooch’s food for fresher breath naturally (leopolds-crate.blogspot.ca).

If your pet is dehydrated or unable to keep foods down, add some low-sodium chicken broth to his drinking water (lifecheating.com).

Clean out an empty syrup bottle and fill with clean water for trips to the dog park or long walks. Simple attach by the handle to a carabiner and hook on your belt loop (fieldandstream.com).

Does Rover scarf his food down too quickly? There’s a hack for that. Place a ball in his food bowl. He will be forced to move the ball around to get to all the food, slowing him down (baggybulldogs blog).

Make your own organic chicken jerky for a gourmet treat. Cut organic chicken breasts or tenders into one-half centimeters in thickness. Then place cling wrap over it and beat with a tenderizing hammer until thin to your liking.

Next, cut into 3-centimeter strips (approximately). Place on a lightly greased baking sheet. Bake at 200 degrees for two hours or until brown and crispy. Now let Fido enjoy a non-toxic, healthy treat. These can be stored for up to two weeks in the fridge. (For the photo guided step-by-step recipe, visit http://imgur.com/a/IkUj7.)

For a homemade summertime snack, cut up apples in chicken broth and freeze in ice cube trays (dogfooddude.blogspot.com).

For the Home

Hang a shower caddy on the inside of a closet door to store all your pet items—

brush, meds, treats, leashes, etc. (BuzzFeed).

Hide a litter box under a side table by securing kitty-sized, cute fabric curtains via baileytann.com. Then tie back one side for your cat to enter (BuzzFeed).

Make a DIY cat scratch by gluing a square carpet sample to a square wooden frame and hang low enough for your cat to reach. Voila, instant wall decor (squarecathabitat.com)!

If your feline friend loves to sit on, or in front of, your computer, place a shallow box lid, such as a board game box lid, upside down to the side of your computer. The natural cat instinct is to sit in the box. You’ll be more productive in no time (BuzzFeed).

‘Tis the Season to Hack

Looking for the perfect gift? Submit a photo of your pet to http://shelterpups.com, and they will create an adorable custom stuffed version of your pooch or anyone else’s—unique indeed.

Store your smaller ornaments in egg cartons. Your pet can’t destroy what he can’t reach if it’s safely tucked inside (toostinkincute.blogspot.com).

Hang wrapping paper on curtain rod hooks to safely keep them away from toddlers and pets who might enjoy unrolling and tearing them to pieces (the soulfulhouse.com).

FYI

While we hope you’ll never need this one, it is worth a try in a desperate situation. LifeHackable.com says one frantic owner ran into two hunters while searching for her dog. They told the owner they had successfully found dogs in the past by taking a worn article of clothing (the longer worn, the better to increase the human’s scent) and leaving it at the location the dog was last seen. If the dog has a familiar toy or two, take those items along also. Attach a note instructing passersby not to move the objects.

Also, leave a bowl of water as the pet may not have had access to water since being lost. Do not leave food that may attract other animals that the dog will avoid. The owner tried it and reported the dog waiting among the items the next day. While not 100-percent guaranteed to work, it’s worth a try to find a loved, lost pet.

In hot temps, cool your pooch down by freezing water, chicken broth, bones, toys, etc., in a cake mold and let him lick away until his heart’s content (Pinterest.com).

If your dog fights having his teeth brushed, squeeze enzymatic pet toothpaste on a Nylabone or rope toy and let him gnaw away on it, getting teeth clean in the process (BuzzFeed).

If you have a teething puppy that enjoys chewing on cords, spritz bitter apple spray onto a paper towel and wipe it along the cord. It will cover the surface area and not waste as much product as spraying directly onto the cord (BuzzFeed).

Run a dryer sheet along your dog’s fur during a thunder-storm. Chances are your pet is more distraught by the static electricity built up in his fur than the thunderstorm. According to marthastewart.com, this should work at least 50 percent of the time (BuzzFeed).

For easy tick removal, soak a cotton ball in liquid soap and swab the tick for a few seconds. The tick should come out on its own and be stuck to the cotton ball when you remove it (sdcount.ca.gov).

These are only a few of the life hacks available. Have some tried-and-true hacks that work? Let us know on our Facebook page at TulsaPets Magazine or tweet us @tulsapetsmag.

DVIS Mutt Strut 2015

posted September 28th, 2015 by
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Let Your ‘Mutt Strut’ For A Good Cause

By Anna Holton-Dean

 

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Domestic Violence Intervention Services (DVIS) in Tulsa is hosting its second annual Mutt Strut Saturday, Oct. 17 at Hunter Park. The dog walk, or “mutt strut,” is designed to raise awareness for the DVIS emergency shelter’s newly-opened kennel, which is the first of its kind in an Oklahoma domestic violence shelter.

Domestic Violence Intervention Services’ new kennel offers shelter to the most helpless of victims.

By bringing your pooch out to participate, you can help domestic violence victims and their pets transition to a better life. Admission to Mutt Strut is an in-kind donation to the kennel, such as gentle pet shampoos, blankets, pet beds, stainless steel water and food bowls, non-allergenic cat litter, bleach wipes and disposable gloves. The first 100 participants to arrive on Oct. 17 will receive dog treats from the Bridges Barkery made by employees of the Bridges Foundation.

Dress your dog in his or her finest costume for the pet contest. He or she may even be crowned king or queen. Have a matching costume for yourself? One winner will also win the title of “Best Owner/Dog Duo.”

DVIS began planning for the kennel last year and is pleased to have officially opened to clients and their pets this past July at its emergency shelter.

The kennel can house up to seven dogs at a time and features a 200-square-foot air-conditioned and heated interior and a 180- square-foot covered exterior space. A 1,773-square-foot outside dog run also gives them a place to run carefree and exercise. The separate cat facility can house up to four cats.

DVIS recognized the fact that many domestic violence victims are pet owners and their pets are a serious consideration when deciding to leave or stay in an abusive situation, Rachel Smith, DVIS community relations coordinator, says.

“Often an abusive partner will kill a pet left behind to get back at the victim for leaving,” she says. “As nearly all clients entering the DVIS emergency shelter have very little or no income, boarding their pets is not usually an option. According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, 71 percent of pet-owning women entering shelters reported that their batterer had injured, maimed, killed or threatened family pets    for revenge or to psychologically control victims. Now the new DVIS shelter offers a kennel for dogs and cats to take away the stress a client might feel if they don’t want to leave their pet behind.”

DVIS Executive Director Tracey Lyall says it’s not only a stress reducer but also a way to ensure “all members of the family are safe, including pets.”

“Often an abusive partner will target a    pet as revenge so we are grateful to offer this for women and men who are abused,” she says. With the kennel’s opening, she says the organization expects to see an influx of pet residents as the word spreads about this vital service.

The kennel recently hosted its first furry guest, Poppy*. During his stay, the DVIS kennel tech made sure Poppy was up-to-date on vaccinations and gave him a flea bath. He also wrote a letter of good behavior for Poppy’s owner to use when she was ready to move into her own apartment.

Another recent DVIS client brought her own dog food for use during her pet’s stay at the kennel, but was happy to receive a toy for her pooch. Most clients aren’t able to come prepared with pet food or paraphernalia so receiving simple items such as blankets, pet beds, treats and toys is a huge relief and source of joy and comfort in an otherwise negative situation.

“It’s important to DVIS to keep families and pets safe and give their owners peace of mind,” Lyall says. “It’s one less thing for a victim to worry about as they prepare to leave their abuser, and that’s key.”

Any resource, such as DVIS’ new kennel, that gives victims the strength and confidence to leave abusive relationships is a worthy cause and something other pet owners can feel good about supporting.

Visit dvis.org to register. For more information, contact Rachel Smith at (918) 508-2711 or [email protected].

 

 

*Name changed to protect privacy.

 

 

Date: Saturday, Oct. 17, 2015

Time: 9 a.m.

Location: Hunter Park

Admission: An in-kind donation: pet shampoo, blankets/pet beds, stainless steel water and food bowls, non-allergenic cat litter, bleach wipes and disposable gloves.

 

Dress your dog in his/her finest costume. Two lucky pooches will be crowned king and queen of the Mutt Strut. One winner will also win the title of “Best Owner/Dog Duo.” Visit dvis.org to register. For more information, contact Rachel Smith at (918) 508-2711 or [email protected]

PupPod

posted September 28th, 2015 by
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New US pet toy ‘PupPod’ promises to keep pups active and engaged while owners are away.

PupPod allows:

  • Pet parents to watch live video of their pups and interact remotely with them as their dogs play
  • Offers a new way to reduce boredom, destructive behaviour and separation anxiety
  • Allows dogs to learn new skills while owners are at work

 Pup Pod

No more lonely, bored dogs.

 

PupPod is a new interactive pet toy that helps reduce boredom, anxiety and destructive behavior in your dog, helping them learn new skills when you’re at away. Pet parents can tune in and interact with their dog while they’re playing with PupPod as well as share and compare progress with friends via a mobile app.

Seattle based Erick Eidus, CEO and founder of PupPod said: “The response to PupPod has been amazing. After dogs have tested it and I go to pack it up, dogs tend to look at me like ‘hey, don’t take my toy away.’ You can tell they are totally engaged and want to keep playing and learning.”

“The feedback we’ve received from the Kickstarter campaign to date has been amazing. We’ve heard from dog experts as well as pet parents who all think that what we are doing is a real break-through in stimulating dogs mentally. Dogs can play PupPod on their own and the game evolves so that the dog is always challenged. In a recent interview with the Discovery Channel, their science reporter said that in four years of covering technology, he’d never seen anything like PupPod and he was super excited about the product.”

“PupPod is actually a very ambitious project. There’s the toy and treat dispenser for the dog. There’s the video camera in the hub for streaming video to a pet parents phone. There’s the PupCloud service and algorthms to analyze all the data from game play so the dog is always challenged and pet parents can start to understand what their dog is thinking and how their dog compares to other dogs of the same breed or age. And we have big plans – a roadmap for a series of toys that all connect to PupPod.”

“PupPod is really a platform to connect dogs and pet parents in a way that hasn’t been available before.”

See it at http://puppod.com/

Embracing Change in Broken Arrow

posted September 26th, 2015 by
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Broken Arrow Animal Shelter Evolves

By Bria Bolton Moore / Photos by Foshay Photography

 

Jacko, a male Labrador/Mastiff mix puppy, is crouched in a pouncing position, eyes fixated on the camera, or maybe on who is behind the camera? It’s Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014, and Jacko is just one of the 33 animals currently available for adoption at the Broken Arrow Animal Shelter.

Throughout the past year, the Broken Arrow Animal Shelter, located at 4121 E. Omaha St., has made a change to ensure that animals like Jacko are not only provided with food, medical attention and shelter, but also a permanent home.

“I was raised in the country. I’m a cowboy at heart and grew up with animals. So, I’ve always cared about animals and their well-being,” says Animal Control Director Larry Dampf. He has been with the shelter since 2003 and served as the director for eight years, seeing the shelter through its recent changes.

Dampf says a lot of the developments came after the shelter moved from a 5,500 square-foot building to its current 13,500 square-foot shelter in August of 2011. With new space, came new opportunity.

New Policies and Procedures

Up until about a year and a half ago, those who adopted a pet from the Broken Arrow Animal Shelter signed a Sterilization Agreement, essentially promising that they would get their new pet spayed or neutered. New pet owners would pay a deposit, get their animals sterilized, and  then the City would refund the deposit back to them. Now, however, pets are spayed or neutered before they’re handed over to their new owners.

“There are a lot of factors that go into the spay and neuter program,” says Dampf, who had been envisioning a different process for more than a decade. “You have to have the vet; you have to have the funding; you have to have the facility. But it’s always been on the radar that we wanted to implement and have every animal spayed or neutered.”

According to the Humane Society of the United States, there are about six to  eight million homeless animals entering animal shelters every year in the United States. Unfortunately, barely half of them  are adopted.

“Spay/neuter is the only permanent, 100-percent effective method of birth  control for dogs and cats,” according to the Humane Society.

“The last thing we want to do is contribute back to shelter over-crowding,” Dampf says. “Through the spay and neuter program, we’re helping to decrease those numbers     in shelters.”

In an effort to better serve its patrons, the Broken Arrow Animal Shelter changed its business hours from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., Monday through Saturday, to 11:30 a.m. to 5:45 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., on Saturday.

“We found that the public really couldn’t get off work and be here at 4 o’clock,” Dampf says. ”Now, it’s easier for them to be able to get here and do business with the Broken Arrow Animal Shelter, which is a real plus.”

Dampf said the shelter has also hired an on-staff veterinarian consultant who comes in on a weekly basis to oversee the health of the animals. Additionally, the shelter  spent $12,000 on new software to track animals under its care, record adoptions   and much more.

The shelter also made a change to how it euthanizes animals. Nationwide, more than 2.7 million healthy, adoptable cats and dogs are euthanized annually in shelters, according to the Humane Society.

About a year ago, the Broken Arrow Animal Shelter got rid of its gas chamber, which was used for euthanasia. The shelter now only uses injection to put animals down.

Interested in Adopting?

Unfortunately, there’s never a shortage of furry friends waiting for their turn to go “home.” Here’s how pet adoption works at the Broken Arrow Animal Shelter:

  1. Visit the shelter, and fill out a questionnaire about the type of pet you’re seeking.
  2. Browse the dogs and cats available for adoption. Spend some time with your potential pet in a “get acquainted room.” While animals surrendered to the shelter are available for adoption immediately, stray animals are kept for five days before they are available for adoption.
  3. When you find the pet that’s right for you, fill out the paperwork and pay the $60 adoption fee, which includes spay or neuter, rabies shot and the five-in-one (includes Parvo, Distemper, Bordatella, etc.).
  4. Pick up your pet the following day after its spay or neuter procedure.

Photos of animals available for adoption can be viewed online at baanimalshelter.com and now also on www.tulsapetsmagazine.com.

All of the shelter’s recent changes point to one thing: the shelter’s desire to serve the people and animals of Broken Arrow.

“Every shelter worker is burdened with saving animals,” Dampf says. “It becomes  the responsibility of the shelter staff to take care of the animal, house him, feed him and then expend every opportunity and every avenue to find another home for that animal.”

Dampf says the shelter will continue to evolve to best serve the Broken Arrow community and find permanent homes for animals like Jacko.

“We must provide the kind of service and care for animals that is needed,” he says, “that is through continued education and making sure that all our processes and business model are up to date.”

Deaf Dogs Can Learn New Tricks Too

posted September 19th, 2015 by
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American Sign Language bridges communication for owners and albino dogs

By Brianna Broersma

 

A special group of dogs live right here in Oklahoma City.  Ceasar, Swayze, Deeyenda and Marvel are all deaf and have limited vision. Their owner, Mrs. Rojas, uses American Sign Language to communicate with them. Rojas has taught them basic signs such as “sit,” “speak” and “outside.”  Rojas says, “I look at the sign I need and teach them the behavior to go with it.”

The dogs’ hearing and vision problems can be attributed to irresponsible breeding.  In some breeds, a “merle” or “dapple” pattern is prized. This means that there are patches of lighter color fur on the dogs’ coats. Some breeders will try to breed two merle dogs together in order to increase the percent of merle puppies in a litter. However, if two merle or dapple dogs are bred together, the effect is cumulative, and it can lead to a “double merle” dog with a completely white coat. This can also remove pigment from the inner ear that is necessary for normal functioning.

Rojas’ dogs inherited their traits from such breeding practices. Ceasar is a 2-year-old Great Dane, and his deafness resulted from Harlequin-to-Harlequin breeding. (A Harlequin Great Dane has Dalmatian-like coloring.) Seven-month-old Mini Dachshund  Deeyenda had two dapple parents. Swayze, a 1-year-old Australian Shepherd, is a “double merle,” a product of merle-to-merle breeding. Rojas’s 6-month-old Rough Collie, Marvel, has an “extreme white pattern.” This removes a large amount of pigment from the face and ears, often resulting in deafness.  Rojas says, “These issues are completely preventable with responsible breeding.”

Other effects include light-sensitive eyes that can have “starburst” pupils. If Rojas takes her dogs out during daylight hours, she has to put special goggles on them. The sunlight is harsh on their eyes and skin,  due to the lack of pigment, Rojas says. She also needs to put special sunscreen on them to ensure they won’t get sunburned. Often, Rojas finds it easier to take them out during twilight or nighttime hours to protect their eyes and skin.

They are viewed as a burden, and Rojas says, “Usually breeders will kill these dogs because they are not profitable.” Sometimes “double merle” dogs can have related health issues such as digestive disorders, skin disorders and seizures. They can also have allergic reactions to some medications.

She has actually had to convince breeders to give her their dogs instead of killing them.  She is hoping to get therapy dog licenses so that her dogs can visit nursing homes, convalescent hospitals or other therapeutic settings.  She also fosters/rescues deaf dogs until a permanent home can be found.

She believes “it’s easier to train deaf dogs because they get distracted less” and actually prefers deaf dogs to hearing dogs.

“Deaf dogs are just like any other dogs,” she says, regarding the training process. When teaching a hearing dog, the owner or trainer teaches with a verbal “yes” or a clicker when a command is obeyed. Then the dog is rewarded with praise or a treat.

“Well, with a deaf dog, you show the American Sign Language sign you are trying to teach,” Rojas says. “For example, ‘sit.’ You stand in front of your deaf dog and show him the ASL sign for sit. Once he sits, immediately show him the ASL sign for ‘yes!’ Then you give him a treat. He learns, ‘OK, when she shows me this sign, and I sit, I get a treat and the yes sign. Therefore, I’m doing what I’m asked to do.’   Be consistent, and they will learn.

“Teaching ‘outside’ is easy too. Just like asking a hearing dog, ‘Do you want to go outside?’ …With a deaf dog, I stand at the door and show him the ASL [sign] for ‘outside,’ then open the door. He learns, ‘OK, when she shows me this sign, she lets me out.’ So he learns to remember what each sign means with each action. It’s actually easy and less challenging than you would think. Dogs are not born knowing English or Spanish or ASL. They learn when they hear a word, or in my dogs’ case, when they see a word and learn its meaning.”

Another tool Rojas employs is a vibration collar, not to be confused with a shock collar. It is used much like a clicker. Instead of click and reward, the dog gets buzzed and rewarded. “This is an important behavior to learn since when they feel the buzz, they look for the handler for a cookie/reward or instruction in ASL.

“This is so important,” she says. “If for any reason your dog is far off—let’s say at the dog park—and you need to call your dog, you can buzz, and they will think, ‘Oh my mom’s calling me!’ They will immediately look for you to give a command, such as come here, go to the car, stop, or look here.”

For anyone with a deaf dog, Rojas and her pets are inspiration that their pets too can lead a happy, obedient, high-quality life.

She has started a Facebook group to get “double merle” pet parents in contact with one another. It includes owners from all over the country and even international members. The group can be found at https://www.facebook.com/groups/202055833234792/. Members share information, photographs and support for raising these special dogs. For more information, contact Rojas under the name “Haulinauss Deafdog Interpreter” on Facebook.

Complete list of ASL signs that Rojas uses with her dogs:

1    Speak

2    Sit

3    Lay down

4    Outside

5    Go to bed

6    No

7    Yes

8    Good boy

9    Car

10  Cookie

11  Inside house

12  Move over

13  Back up

14  Stop

15  Walk

16  Look

17  Water

18  Food

19  Drop it

20  Come here

21  Go to dad

22  Up

23  Heel

24  Shake

How to Find a Pet Friendly Apartment

posted September 16th, 2015 by
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BY CRYSTAL TSENG

SEPTEMBER 16, 2015

If you have a furry family member, it can be challenging to find the perfect apartment where you can all live. Apartment List recently published data about the top cities for dog and cat lovers; today, we’re here to help you understand how to find a pet-friendly apartment.

Pet Friendly Apts2

Fees and Restrictions

First, we’ll address the common restrictions and fees that you may face.

Restrictions

Every landlord has a different pet policy, but most have one or more of the following rules for tenants bringing pets:

Number of pets: Most apartment buildings limit residents to a total of 2 pets.

Weight restrictions: Some apartments do not allow (or may charge additional fees for) dogs over 55 lbs.

Aggressive dogs: Many landlords will not allow residents to bring dogs deemed “aggressive”. There’s no set list, but this usually includes Pit Bulls, Dobermans, Rotweillers, German Shepherds, and Great Danes. While your pet may be harmless, most landlords (and insurance companies) find these breeds to be risky tenants!

Pet Fees

In our experience, almost all apartments require tenants to pay a premium for bringing your canine or feline friend along. Some states and cities place limits on these fees, so you may want to research local regulations if your landlord requires payments that are astronomically high. Here are the fees that we commonly see:

 Pet Friendly Apts

Know your rights

Note that people with disabilities have a right to have service or emotional support pets, even if the leasing agreement specifically prohibits pets. You do not have to disclose your disability to the landlord. Additionally, service and emotional support pets are not subject to pet fees.

What you can do

The list of fees and restrictions can be daunting, but Apartment List is here to help! Many landlords and property managers can be flexible with policies as long as you can show that you and your pet are responsible tenants. Here are three strategies to convince your landlord that your pet is a safe bet.

  1. Build a pet resume

Building a pet resume is all about showcasing your pet, and makes the screening process faster. Things you can include in your pet’s resume are: photo, description, training certification, health records, habits, grooming. The Peninsula Humane Society provides a good example of what your pet resume can include.  A letter of recommendation from previous landlords and neighbors helps too!

  1. Promote yourself and your pet

Let your landlord know you share similar concerns about cleanliness. Express that your pet is potty-trained, vaccinated, flea-controlled, etc. Getting a training certificate like the Canine Good Citizen’s for dogs is a good way to prove to your landlord your pet would be a good tenant.

  1. Get insurance for your pet

Liability is a top concern for landlords, and one of the main reasons landlords are against pets. Landlords will feel more comfortable allowing pets if they are insured – this can be especially helpful if you have an aggressive breed. Be sure to find out whether your insurance has a dog bite exclusion, dangerous breed exclusion or other limitations.

Note that most rental insurance companies do not cover dog bites, so you may need to get a separate pet insurance policy.The Federation of Insured Dog Owners will provide canine liability insurance policies for all breeds of dogs.

Finally, we at Apartment List are here to help! You can use our site to search for apartments that allow dogs or cats, making it easy for you to find the perfect place for you and your furry friend. Good luck hunting!

 

Photo attributions:

Cat and dog: Photo by kitty.green66 / CC By 2.0

Dog: Photo by Hotphotochick / CC BY-SA 3.0

Cat: Photo by Adriano Makoto Suzuki used under CC BY 2.0

September 16, 2015   |    by Crystal Tseng