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Hero Kastma

posted March 16th, 2012 by
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Hero Vom Haus Kastma

Hero served the streets of Broken Arrow with me for seven years. He suffered from advanced stages of hip dysplasia and we had no choice but to put an end to his pain. Hero was a wonderful partner and will be truly missed. Thank you so much to everyone for all of your support.  From a happier time.

Rest in Peace brave Warrior

Paws to Remember and Blessing of the Animals

posted September 29th, 2011 by
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Paws to Remember Logo 2

By Stacy Pettit

       The love an owner has for his or her pet is often hard to explain. It is often crippling and beyond difficult to say goodbye to those beloved family members when they pass, but many pet owners cling to the hope that all dogs (and cats) go to heaven.  Many just cross their fingers and dream that up in the clouds are piles of rawhides and cat toys for Fido and Mittens to keep themselves entertained while they wait for their owners.

       For those who tie their love for their pets with their devotion to religion, Sunday, October 2 is an opportunity for you to tie them into one.  TulsaPets Magazine and St. Patrick’s Episcopal Church, 4250 Houston Street in Broken Arrow, will be holding a memorial service and blessing of animals for anyone who wishes to join in.  The memorial service will begin at 3p.m. and is then followed by the blessing.  Any and all types of animals are invited to attend and be blessed.

       The blessings will not stop with the ceremony either.  Everyone attending is encouraged to bring donations for the Pet Adoption League, the benefactor for this event.  Of course monetary donations are accepted, but PAL will also be taking dog and cat food, leashes, beds, and other items that will help the animals in PAL’s care.

Vet Field Trip Fascinates Kids

posted March 15th, 2011 by
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STORY BY KRISTI EATON

PHOTOS BY BOB FOSHAY(FOSHAY STUDIO & GALLERY)

HUDDLED In A TINY surgical suite, about  the size of a walk-in closet, seven secondgraders watch as Kevin Long, DVM, reaches  for a sharp blade. There are more observers  standing outside, peeking through a window  into the suite.

Clad in surgery mask, scrubs and gloves,  Long, the veterinarian at Good Shepherd  Veterinary Hospital in Broken Arrow, places  the blade against Ruff Ruff’s belly. He slowly  moves the blade from end-to-end on the  canine, making a long incision.

Earlier, the students watched Long weigh  Ruff Ruff and do a physical examination of the  dog’s heart, lungs, ears, eyes and mouth. The  canine was being checked because he swallowed an unknown object and was suffering  from abdominal  discomfort. The students were allowed to feel  his belly and guess what the object could be.

“It feels like a fork,” says one student.  “No, it  feels like a magnifying glass,” says another.

An X-ray showed that Ruff Ruff swallowed  scissors and Long decided surgery was necessary. 

“I’m scared. That’s scary,” one girl says, as  Long selects the blade.

“It’s OK. It’s all pretend,” the vet says.

In fact, the sweeping cut Long made along  Ruff Ruff’s belly wasn’t real at all.  Velcro was all  that kept Long from opening up Ruff Ruff’s stomach and removing the scissors.

Ruff Ruff is a toy, a Pillow Pet borrowed from  Long’s 3-year-old son.

The kids, second-  and third-graders  from Immanuel  Lutheran Christian  Academy, along  with various home  school students,  are on a field trip to  learn proper animal  care and what a  veterinarian does. It’s the second  field trip Long has  hosted and he  hopes to make it a regular event.

“The more kids that want to experience what  it’s like to be a veterinarian, that’s what we  want,” he says.

In addition to watching Ruff Ruff’s “treatment,” the 35 students saw how X-ray equipment works, viewed blood under a microscope,  and were given stethoscopes to listen to the  real heart beats of Betty, a 7-year-old Spaniel  mix owned by vet technician DeAndra Roberts,  and Sugar, whose owner, Adrienne Ashworth,  is the receptionist at Good Shepherd.

Ellis Stevens, 8, says he enjoyed looking  at the X-ray and discovering what was inside  Ruff Ruff’s stomach, while Taylor Mosby,  also 8, says her favorite part of the field trip  was the surgery “because you could see him  (Long) open him up.” She also enjoyed looking  through the microscope at the blood, something she is currently learning about at school.

Long says he enjoys letting the students feel  Ruff Ruff’s stomach and guess what could be  inside, similar to what he does as a vet.

“They’re literally doing what I do on a live animal – to see if I can feel something in there. It’s  a very important part of what we do,” he says. “It’s fun to see their eyes light up when they feel  something because I don’t think they’re expecting that. Their mind starts churning and then  they get excited about the X-ray….You can see  their brains starting to turn. ”

He also hopes the students will take away knowledge about proper pet care. “We want kids to  know the right thing to do, so when their animal is sick,  they know the vet is where they go,” he says. “It’s like  when your stomach is sick, you know your mom takes  you to the doctor.”

The field trips grew out of a discussion between  Long and his wife, Stacey, a kindergarten teacher  at Immanuel Lutheran. Long, who graduated from  Oklahoma State University’s College of Veterinary  Medicine in 2002, believes his classmates with veterinary parents had a leg-up in school,  they had experience touching animals and knowing the ins and outs of  how things work in the office, he says.

“Students like me, without parents who were vets, it  was almost like a little bit of catch up.”

When the couple designed the Good Shepherd  clinic, they wanted the space to be family-friendly and  conducive to learning. Every room has a window and  mothers can watch what their kids are doing from the  waiting area.

“So the room works in both directions, providing a  learning opportunity from the outside in, and the mom  being able to watch her kids from the inside out,” Long  says.

The field trips, open to 3-year-olds to high school  students and all area schools – public, private and  home school, are held once weekly. The 1.5 hour visits  ideally include up to 30 students.

They are developing curricula for the older students,  who will see and experience more technical aspects. For example, high school students will see and examine real X-rays and may get to observe surgeries.

The field trips are currently free, thanks to grants  from the Future Vet Program that has covered the cost  of the stethoscopes provided to the students. Merial  drug company donated plastic ticks. If the funding  eventually runs out, Long says he may charge $1 or $2 for the stethoscopes, but it will still be a reasonable  price, he says.

For Information

Good Shepherd Veterinary Hospital
Lynn Lane and Broken Arrow Expressway,
Broken Arrow
www.goodshepherdvets.com
918-893-3400