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Happy Birthday to you!

posted June 4th, 2013 by
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The Humane Society of Tulsa is running a special promotion for all of you summer babies out there.

For anyone with a June, July or August birthday, the rescue organization is offering cats and dogs for an adoption fee of only $25!

This is a great deal for someone in need of a pet and looking to make their birthday extra special. The promotion ends Aug. 31.

The Humane Society of Tulsa is located at 6232 E. 60th St. and their hours are Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

View some of their adoptable animals online at http://www.tulsapets.com/.

You can call their adoption center at 918-495-3647.

- Lauren Cavagnolo, [email protected]

Humane Society of Tulsa reaches more milestones

posted April 9th, 2012 by
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Humane Society of Tulsa 2B

Record transport – again – and 1,000 pets transferred aboard PetSmart Charities® Rescue Waggin’® Vehicle

In February, the Humane Society of Tulsa sent 72 dogs and puppies aboard PetSmart Charities® Rescue Waggin’® vehicle – the largest single transport in this life-saving program.

 

In less than two months, the Humane Society of Tulsa is setting more milestones.

 

First, they are boarding another record-setting transport on the Rescue Waggin’ vehicle this week – another 75 dogs and puppies.

 

Second, they are reaching their 1,000th pet transferred, setting this record in just 18 months – six months before any other shelter in the program.

 

“Pet overpopulation is a massive problem in Tulsa,” says Gina Gardner, President for the Humane Society of Tulsa. “Many of the puppies going on the Rescue Waggin’ vehicles are pulled from our city-operated shelter because they euthanize seven out of every 10 animals. The puppies heading out on the Rescue Waggin’ vehicle would likely be euthanized if not for the PetSmart Charities program.”

 

Dogs leaving the Humane Society of Tulsa are sent to the Humane Society of Boulder Valley in Boulder, Colo, where they are generally adopted within a week of arriving at the shelter.

 

“Clearly, the Humane Society of Tulsa is very committed to getting as many dogs and puppies as they can aboard the Rescue Waggin’ vehicle every month,” says Susanna Della Maddalena, Executive Director for PetSmart Charities. “They are doing a great job at saving so many lives.”

 

The Humane Society of Tulsa is one of 60 shelters that participate in the PetSmart Charities Rescue Waggin’ program – a national transport program that transfers adoptable dogs and puppies from animal shelters in communities with severe pet overpopulation problems and few adopters to animal shelters in other communities where adoptable dogs and puppies are more in demand.

Since joining the Rescue Waggin’ program, the Humane Society of Tulsa has also received $16,000 in grant monies to purchase two new cat condos, two stainless steel kennels for their dog isolation area, and the improvement of outdoor areas for dogs.

The Rescue Waggin’ Program operates in the East Coast, Midwest, Great Plains, and South Central states. More than 55,000 dogs and puppies have been saved through the Rescue Waggin’ program since it began in 2004.

The PetSmart Charities’ Rescue Waggin’ program is funded by donations. Members of the public can support the program by making a donation online, by email at [email protected] or via phone at 623-587-2826, to help more pets like these find the loving homes they deserve.

 

For more information on the Humane Society of Tulsa, please visit www.tulsapets.com.

 

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About the Humane Society of Tulsa

The Humane Society of Tulsa is a private non-profit organization committed to the promotion of responsible animal ownership and pet population control.  We strive to accomplish these goals by working hand in hand with our community to provide education, counseling and assistance on proper pet care and the importance of spaying and neutering. We hope to inspire awareness and compassion for all animals great and small.

 

About PetSmart Charities

Established in 1994, PetSmart Charities, Inc. is an independent, nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization that creates and supports programs that save the lives of homeless pets, raise awareness of companion animal welfare issues and promote healthy relationships between people and pets. The largest funder of animal-welfare efforts in North America, PetSmart Charities has provided more than $165 million in grants and programs benefiting animal-welfare organizations and has helped save the lives of nearly 5 million pets through its in-store adoption program. To learn more about how PetSmart Charities is working toward its vision of a lifelong, loving home for every pet, visit petsmartcharities.org or call 1-800-423-PETS (7387).

Thank You! Humane Society of Tulsa & Washington Co. SPCA

posted January 23rd, 2012 by
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Rescue Waggin

More than 9,541 dogs and puppies boarded PetSmart Charities® Rescue Waggin’® vehicle in 2011

642 of those dogs and puppies were from the Humane Society of Tulsa – the most lives saved among participating shelters

517 of those dogs and puppies were from Washington County SPCA

 

PHOENIX, AZ, JANUARY 18, 2012 – Every day, overcrowded animal shelters look for new ways to save the lives of homeless pets, such as promoting adoptions and encouraging people to sterilize their pets.

To that end, the Humane Society of Tulsa and the Washington County SPCA are among 60 animal shelters across the country that participate every month in PetSmart Charities® Rescue Waggin’® program – a national transport program that has saved more than 52,000 dogs and puppies since 2004.

In 2011, the Rescue Waggin’ program transported 9,541 dogs and puppies from overcrowded animal shelters, like the Humane Society of Tulsa, to animal shelters in other communities where adoptable dogs and puppies are more in demand.

TulsaPets MagazineThe Humane Society of Tulsa boarded 642 dogs and puppies on a Rescue Waggin’ vehicle in 2011 – the most of any participating Rescue Waggin’ partner – significantly reducing the number of homeless pets needing homes in Tulsa, Okla. Through this program, the Humane Society of Tulsa also received $16,000 in grant support from PetSmart Charities for shelter improvements.


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TulsaPets MagazineThe Washington County SPCA boarded 517 dogs and puppies on a Rescue Waggin’ vehicle in 2011, successfully reducing the number of homeless pets needing homes in Bartlesville, Okla. Through this program, the Washington County SPCA also received $52,000 in 2011  to establish a spay/neuter program where they currently provide 100 spay and neuter surgeries a month to those who qualify.  

“Until more people spay and neuter their pets and we reduce the number of animals entering shelters, the Rescue Waggin’ program will continue to be a resource for shelters working to change the fate of homeless dogs in their communities,” says Susanna Della Maddalena, executive director of PetSmart Charities, Inc.

PetSmart Charities Rescue Waggin’ vehicles run along the East Coast, Midwest, Great Plains and South Central States.

The Rescue Waggin’ program is a three-part program designed to help shelters save pets’ lives, which includes the transport program as well as grants for spay and neuter expansion and professional consultations and funding support from PetSmart Charities for enhanced operations and shelter improvements for participating shelters.

To learn about the many ways PetSmart Charities is saving the lives of homeless pets, visit PetsmartCharities.org. Members of the public can support these programs by making a tax-deductible donation online, by email at [email protected] or via phone at 623-587-2826 to help save the lives of homeless pets across the U.S., Canada and Puerto Rico.

For more information on the Humane Society of Tulsa, visit TulsaPets.com.
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About PetSmart Charities®
Established in 1994, PetSmart Charities, Inc. is an independent, nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization that creates and supports programs that save the lives of homeless pets, raise awareness of companion animal-welfare issues, and promote healthy relationships between people and pets. The largest funder of animal-welfare efforts in North America, PetSmart Charities® has provided more than $134 million in grants and programs benefiting animal-welfare organizations and has helped save the lives of nearly 5 million pets through its in-store adoption program. To learn more about how PetSmart Charities is working toward its vision of a lifelong, loving home for every pet, visit petsmartcharities.org or call 1-800-423-PETS (7387).

Big Changes Coming To Tulsa Animal Welfare

posted November 15th, 2011 by
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Changes are coming to Tulsa

By Anna Holten-Dean

Changes are coming to TulsaEvery month, hundreds of cats, dogs and other animals are brought in to the Tulsa Animal Welfare Shelter. Ideally, they are adopted, rescued, fostered or returned to their owners. But reality – and the fate of the majority – is nowhere near ideal. In September, of the 656 dogs brought in, 418 were euthanized.

While the current circumstances are grim, the obvious need for a change (and a total revolution to the system) is not lost on animal welfare and city officials, as plans are in the works to change these monthly statistics and, most importantly, decrease euthanizations.
Tulsa Animal Welfare Shelter Manager Jean Letcher Jenkins tells TulsaPets Magazine the first step toward improvements came from the Mayor’s commissioning of KPMG, the national auditing, tax and advisory firm, to study all City operations. The Management Review Office was created in October 2010 to review and implement the KPMG Report suggestions. In July 2011, the MRO sent a Request for Information to 58 local and national animal welfare agencies to gather ideas on efficiency and effectiveness of Animal Welfare operations.

However, Jenkins says only three of the 58 organizations responded to the request, including Tulsa SPCA, Oklahoma Alliance for Animals (OAA), and the Humane Society of Tulsa (HST). “OAA’s suggestions expressed support for current programs and suggested other programs for increasing adoptions and encouraging spay/neuter,” she says.
“Tulsa SPCA made some suggestions, but said they have as much as they can handle with what they already have.

The Humane Society came back with a proposal of how they would like to help animals in the shelter. This kick started negotiations of a partnership/contract between the Humane Society and the Tulsa Animal Shelter.” The partnerships between Tulsa Animal Welfare and the Tulsa Humane Society is slated to transition over the next six months, and should save the lives of more animals as, hopefully, the new policy will be to hold all healthy and adoptable animals (no kill), unless sick. Jenkins says adoptions will be handled through the Humane Society, and she will continue to work toward implementing spay/ neuter laws, awareness of spay/neuter laws through classified ads, and an animal helpdesk.

While there seems to be hope on the horizon for the future of many Tulsa animals, Jenkins and all those at the Animal Shelter are already doing everything within their power to reduce euthanasia rates and the production of homeless pets, based on the results of a 2007 audit under Mayor Kathy Taylor’s administration. Taylor also put together a taskforce to look at the recommendations and prioritize them. Jenkins was hired to implement the recommendations, although it is a difficult, daunting task – comparable to extinguishing a forest fire with only a water gun.

Changes are coming to Tulsa“The audit of the shelter in 2007 recommended all kinds of things,” Jenkins says, “from ways of conducting euthanasia to redoing the floors. We implemented everything in the study that we could afford. Looking at our budget of 1.8 million per year, it is down from 2.2 million when I started. We would love to do more fostering than we do, but to do it right is a full time job. We mostly foster very young puppies and kittens. We don’t participate in a lot of events. The animals have to be in the shelter to be reclaimed. You can’t take them home in a foster situation and still have them shown for adoption. It is better for puppies to be fostered than dogs waiting to be reclaimed. Again not all recommendations have happened because we can’t afford it. We have an $8 million facility in the long-term (5 year) plan. It consists of renovation and expansion of the existing facility as we are always full.” While the partnership is not finalized, Jenkins remains focused on the task at hand of reducing shelter – and ultimately, euthanization – numbers. She is currently working on implementing two programs, the first of which is for feral cats. She is pursuing a trap, neuter release program, along with a feral cat database. The second program will be a targeted spay/ neuter program for Pit Bulls, who make up 30 to 40 percent of shelter animals.

The result of the contract between Tulsa Animal Welfare and the Tulsa Humane Society remains to be seen.
The logistics are also not concrete, but hopes are high among those who have a stake in animal welfare that the number of euthanizations will decrease, while those rescued will increase, as that is the ultimate purpose – to save lives.

However, only time will tell what truly comes of the partnership, and TulsaPets Magazine will be covering the progress and updating all of you, the readers, who are concerned about the fate of Tulsa’s homeless animal population.