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TulsaPets Mag July / August 2016

posted July 12th, 2016 by
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TulsaPets

TulsaPets Magazine  July/August 2016

Publisher – Marilyn King  [email protected]

Creative Director – Debra Fite

Advertising Sales – Marilyn King, Steve Kirkpatrick

Web Manager – Steve Kirkpatrick  [email protected]

Editor – Anna Holton-Dean

Contributing Writers – Marilyn King, Lauren Cavagnolo, Jay Cronley, Drew Edmondson, Anna Holton-Dean, Nancy Gallimore, Allison Geary, Sherri Goodall, Camille Hulen, Cindy Webb

PO Box 14128 Tulsa, OK 74159-1128

(918) 520-0611

(918) 346-6044 Fax

©2016 All rights reserved.

No part of this publication may be reproduced without the express consent of the publisher.

TulsaPets Magazine provides Tulsa area pet owners with a one-stop resource for local products, services, events and information.  Now TulsaPets Magazine Online is able to provide you with all of that and much more, interactive and up-to-the-minute!

TulsaPets Mag Mar / Apr 2016

posted March 8th, 2016 by
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TulsaPets

TulsaPets Magazine  March/April 2016

Publisher – Marilyn King  [email protected]

Creative Director – Debra Fite

Advertising Sales – Marilyn King, Steve Kirkpatrick

Web Manager – Steve Kirkpatrick  [email protected]

Editor – Anna Holton-Dean

Contributing Writers – Marilyn King, Nancy Gallimore, Cindy Webb, Nicole Castillo, Allison Geary, Anna Holton-Dean, Kelly Jo Sigler, Manda Overturf Shank

PO Box 14128 Tulsa, OK 74159-1128

(918) 520-0611

(918) 346-6044 Fax

©2016 All rights reserved.

No part of this publication may be reproduced without the express consent of the publisher.

TulsaPets Magazine provides Tulsa area pet owners with a one-stop resource for local products, services, events and information.  Now TulsaPets Magazine Online is able to provide you with all of that and much more, interactive and up-to-the-minute!

TulsaPets Mag Jan / Feb 2016

posted January 14th, 2016 by
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TulsaPets

TulsaPets Magazine  January/February 2016

Publisher – Marilyn King  [email protected]

Creative Director – Debra Fite

Advertising Sales – Marilyn King, Steve Kirkpatrick

Web Manager – Steve Kirkpatrick  [email protected]

Editor – Anna Holton-Dean

Contributing Writers – Marilyn King, Lauren Cavagnolo, Nancy Gallimore, Cindy Webb, Nicole Castillo, Allison Geary, Camille Hulen

PO Box 14128 Tulsa, OK 74159-1128

(918) 520-0611

(918) 346-6044 Fax

©2015 All rights reserved.

No part of this publication may be reproduced without the express consent of the publisher.

TulsaPets Magazine provides Tulsa area pet owners with a one-stop resource for local products, services, events and information.  Now TulsaPets Magazine Online is able to provide you with all of that and much more, interactive and up-to-the-minute!

TulsaPets Mag Nov / Dec 2015

posted November 12th, 2015 by
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TulsaPets

TulsaPets Magazine  November/December 2015

Publisher – Marilyn King  [email protected]

Creative Director – Debra Fite

Advertising Sales – Marilyn King, Steve Kirkpatrick

Web Manager – Steve Kirkpatrick  [email protected]

Editor – Anna Holton-Dean

Contributing Writers – Marilyn King, Anna Holton-Dean, Lauren Cavagnolo, Nancy Gallimore, Cindy Webb, Mary Green, Sherri Goodall

PO Box 14128 Tulsa, OK 74159-1128

(918) 520-0611

(918) 346-6044 Fax

©2015 All rights reserved.

No part of this publication may be reproduced without the express consent of the publisher.

TulsaPets Magazine provides Tulsa area pet owners with a one-stop resource for local products, services, events and information.  Now TulsaPets Magazine Online is able to provide you with all of that and much more, interactive and up-to-the-minute!

TulsaPets Mag Sept / Oct 2015

posted September 10th, 2015 by
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20150915

TulsaPets Magazine  September/October 2015

Publisher – Marilyn King  [email protected]

Creative Director – Debra Fite

Advertising Sales – Marilyn King, Steve Kirkpatrick

Web Manager – Steve Kirkpatrick  [email protected]

Editor – Anna Holton-Dean

Contributing Writers – Marilyn King, Anna Holton-Dean, Blaize Dicus, Nancy Gallimore, Bria Bolton Moore, Ruth Steinberger, Cindy Webb

PO Box 14128 Tulsa, OK 74159-1128

(918) 520-0611

(918) 346-6044 Fax

©2015 All rights reserved.

No part of this publication may be reproduced without the express consent of the publisher.

TulsaPets Magazine provides Tulsa area pet owners with a one-stop resource for local products, services, events and information.  Now TulsaPets Magazine Online is able to provide you with all of that and much more, interactive and up-to-the-minute!

Piper and GP

posted August 10th, 2012 by
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Piper 1A

by Lauren Cavagnolo

Stop by the Free’s residence on any given day, and you’re likely to run across a pretty common sight: a mama dog looking after her baby, cleaning out his ears and play wrestling, preparing him for the world. Piper and GP are like any other mother and puppy. Nearly insep­arable, Piper guards over GP the way only a loving, nurturing mother can. But Piper is not GP’s natural mother, and that isn’t the only thing that makes this couple different.

 

Piper is a 2-year-old rescued Pit Bull mix, and GP, short for Goat Puppy, is— you guessed it— a goat. “They wrestle in the front yard together. The neigh­bors absolutely think we have lost our minds, I know,” said their owner Julie Free.

 

Free and her husband, Nathan, are self-described “animal nuts.” They share their property in Inola with horses, dogs and goats. “That’s plenty, trust me,” Julie said.

 

Piper and GP’s unusual relationship began in April the night GP was born. Nathan is a truck driver, and Julie was home alone the night GP and his two sisters came into the world. But the birth did not occur without compli­cations, leaving Julie in a frightening situation.

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“[GP] wasn’t moving. I’d already called my husband and said I don’t think we can save this one,” Julie said. “Me being the animal nut I am, after all of the babies were born, I took him in­side to put him on a heating pad. I had all the dogs but [Piper] in their crates, and I had put him on a towel in the middle of the floor.”

Piper stared at the lifeless baby goat until Julie allowed her to inspect him. “I finally said, ‘OK,’ her release word, and she started licking him, and he came around,” Julie said.

 

In that moment Piper and GP forged a special bond. The first few nights of his life, GP slept in a dog crate inside the Frees’ home. Guided by her motherly in­stincts, Piper made sure to check on her new companion about every two hours during the night—just like any new mom would wake to check on her baby—and also waking the Frees in the process.

 

Though the couple has raised baby goats before, they say they have never had another animal take up with the goats like Piper has taken to GP. “They just absolutely adore each other,” Julie said. “My guess is he’s kind of imprinted on her. That was his first experience after he was born.”

 

The fact that GP’s actual mother re­jected him makes his relationship with Piper even more important. “She just wouldn’t take them. She wanted nothing to do with him or his sisters,” Julie said. GP’s mother and both sisters have since been sold to other families to be kept as pets.

 

In addition to accompanying Piper on her walks at night, GP has even fol­lowed her over jumps during her agility practice—no easy feat for a little goat. They also play wrestle together; though like any parent, Piper is gentle with her smaller companion. “Most of their play sessions end with Piper on her back,” Ju­lie said. “It’s amazing to watch.”

 

While the Frees plan to keep GP and say he can spend as much time as he wants outside with Piper, he won’t be coming in the house to hang out on the couch with her anytime soon. “He stays with the other goats. There are limits,” Julie said.

 

Natural Instinct

Piper’s relationship with GP is not the first time the Frees have observed her mothering abilities. “The first time we fostered puppies, she got us up in the middle of the night to go check on them,” Julie said. “We would think she would have to go out, but instead she would go to the crate where the puppies were and just stare at them and make sure they were OK and then go back to bed.”

 

Surprisingly, Piper has never had her own litter of puppies. But that hasn’t prevented her ability to nurture at all. “It doesn’t matter what it is; if it is a small animal, she loves it,” Julie said.

 

Erin Reed, DVM at 15th Street Veteri­nary Group, says Piper’s behavior is based in instinct. “The goat will have imprinted on (bonded to) the dog, but only instinct really explains the connection from the dog to the goat,” Reed said. “It is amazing how animals bond.”

 

And as astonishing as it is to see a Pit Bull mother a goat, or any of the other unusual mother-baby pairings that pop up in the media occasionally, the behavior isn’t completely uncommon. “It really just amazes me as much as everyone else, and I can’t explain it,” Reed said. “It is amazing how in sync they become with each other. We do hear a lot of those stories, but by the same token, I think it’s an amazing thing.”

 

Lauren Johnson, DVM with Hammond Animal Hospital, agrees that it’s not easy to ex­plain. “As far as those animals with a mothering instinct that have never had offspring, it’s hard to know what brings that out in any species,” Johnson said. “I’ve seen male dogs and cats with maternal instinct. I think most living things have an innate instinct to take care of babies, but some take it further than others.”

 

In fact, the natural instinct to mother is the reason orphaned puppies and kit­tens are often paired with nursing dogs and cats. “We do a ton of adoption work, and often find orphaned litters in need of nursing moms,” Johnson said. “If we can­not locate any, we find ourselves volun­teering to bottle feed.”

 

Not What You Would Expect

Ironically, Julie says if she had realized Piper was part Pit Bull, she and her hus­band probably would not have adopted her. “We found Piper online and went to the shelter to meet her. This skin and bones dog just curled up on my lap,” Julie said. “We took her to the vet for a checkup, and the vet said, ‘We think she’s a pit,’ and I went ‘Oh, my gosh!’ because I didn’t know any more than what you hear in the media.”

 

Julie and Nathan decided to give Piper a chance and started taking her to dog parks and dog classes to socialize and train her. “This has been so totally oppo­site of what you hear in the media about Pits or Pit mixes,” Julie said. “She’s the best behaved dog we have.”

 

Piper even inspired Julie to start a Facebook page called Piper’s Pit Bull Place that she uses to provide resources and information about the controversial and often misunderstood breed. Train­ing tips are posted monthly and Pit Bulls available for adoption are promoted on the site.

The page is a joint effort with Chou­teau Pound Pals, the shelter from which Piper was adopted. Piper and GP also re­cently helped raise money for the shelter in June by performing an agility demon­stration together at their fundraiser, Pups in the Park.

Regardless of what others may think, GP doesn’t seem to mind that Piper is part Pit Bull. “He darn sure thinks he’s hers,” Julie said. “I’m not convinced he thinks he’s a goat.”

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